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I need to distribute a large integer budget randomly among a small array with n elements, so that all elements in the array will have the same distribution and sum up to budget and each element in the array gets at least min.

I have an algorithm that runs in O(budget):

private int[] distribute(int budget, int n, int min) {
  int[] subBudgets = new int[n];
  for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
    subBudgets[i] = min;
  }
  budget -= n * min;
  while (budget > 0) {
    subBudgets[random.nextInt(n)]++;
    budget--;
  }
  return subBudgets;
}

However, when budget increases, it can be very expensive. Is there any algorithm that runs in O(n) or even better?

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What is the random distribution that you want to acheive? There are many different kinds of random distribution, some are easy to apply to your case in O(n), some are not. –  RBarryYoung Oct 22 '13 at 22:06
    
@RBarryYoung: He already gives that info implicitly: he's wanting the distribution that you would get by assigning individual dollars uniformly at random to each budget until they're all gone. This would be the multinomial distribution having budget trials, n categories, and with each category having probability 1/n. –  j_random_hacker Oct 22 '13 at 22:30
    
@j_random_hacker No, that's an assumption on your part, he's never said that. All he said was "distribute..randomly", which is as ambiguous as possible and in my experience usually means that they haven't really thought about the implications of different kinds of random distributions. If that is really what the OP wants, then all he has to do is to say it, but that's a fairly odd yet specific distribution for someone to demand without knowing its name. –  RBarryYoung Oct 22 '13 at 23:34
    
Sorry for my ambiguity. I've updated it to explicitly state that the n elements have the same distribution. –  Clive Oct 23 '13 at 1:03
    
@RBarryYoung: No, he implicitly gave the distribution he wants via the algorithm he provided. That algorithm samples from a multinomial distribution having the parameters I described -- by providing that code snippet, he eliminated any potential ambiguity. Also I don't think the multinomial distribution is "odd" -- it's surely one of the more common ones, though a lot of people who use it don't know its name. –  j_random_hacker Oct 23 '13 at 2:02
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

First generate n random numbers x[i], sum them up and then divide budget by the sum and you will get k. Then assign k*x[i] to each array element. It is simple and O(n).

If you want there at least min value in each element you can modify above algorithm by filling all elements by min (or use k*x[i] + min) and subcontracting n*min from budget before starting above algorithm.

If you need working with integers you can approach problem by using real value k and rounding k*x[i]. Then you have to track accumulating rounding error and add or subtract accumulated error from calculated value if it reach whole unit. You have to also assign remaining value into last element to reach whole budget.

P.S.: Note this algorithm can be used with easy in pure functional languages. It is reason why I like this whole family of algorithms generating random numbers for each member and then do some processing afterward. Example of implementation in Erlang:

-module(budget).

-export([distribute/2, distribute/3]).

distribute(Budget, N) ->
  distribute(Budget, N, 0).

distribute(Budget, N, Min) when
    is_integer(Budget), is_integer(N), N > 0,
    is_integer(Min), Min >= 0, Budget >= N*Min ->
  Xs = [random:uniform() || _ <- lists:seq(1,N) ],
  Rest = Budget - N*Min,
  K = Rest / lists:sum(Xs),
  F = fun(X, {Bgt, Err, Acc}) ->
      Y = X*K + Err,
      Z = round(Y),
      {Bgt - Z, Y - Z, [Z + Min | Acc]}
  end,
  {Bgt, _, T} = lists:foldl(F, {Rest, 0.0, []}, tl(Xs)),
  [Bgt + Min | T].

Same algorithm in C++ (?? I dunno.)

private int[] distribute(int budget, int n, int min) {
  int[] subBudgets = new int[n];
  double[] rands = new double[n];
  double k, err = 0, sum = 0;
  budget -= n * min;
  for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
    rands[i] = random.nextDouble();
    sum += rands[i];
  }
  k = (double)budget/sum;
  for (int i = 1; i < n; i++) {
    double y = k*rands[i] + err;
    int z = floor(y+0.5);
    subBudgets[i] = min + z;
    budget -= z;
    err = y - z;
  }
  subBudgets[0] = min + budget;
  return subBudgets;
}
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It seems that OP wants every element to be an integer. I'm not sure your answer is able to guarantee that. –  Terry Li Oct 22 '13 at 23:06
    
Yep, but you can modify algorithm to achieve it. I'm letting it to figure it out for requester. –  Hynek -Pichi- Vychodil Oct 22 '13 at 23:13
    
This algorithm adds the error of previous element to the next one. Would it make the first element less than others statistically? –  Clive Oct 25 '13 at 2:21
    
@Clive: Definitely not. All numbers are same random and the err has uniform probability in (-0.5,0.5) interval for each array member, so definitely not. It is perfectly random. –  Hynek -Pichi- Vychodil Oct 25 '13 at 9:35
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Sampling from the Multinomial Distribution

The way that you are currently distributing the dollars left over after min has been given to each subbudget involves performing a fixed number budget of random "trials", where on each trial you randomly select one of n categories, and you want to know how many times each category is selected. This is modeled by a multinomial distribution with the following parameters:

  • Number of trials (called n on the WP page): budget
  • Number of categories (called k on the WP page): n
  • Probability of category i in each trial, for 1 <= i <= n: 1/n

The way you are currently doing it is a good way if the number of trials is around the same size as the number of categories, or less. But if the budget is large, there are other more efficient ways of sampling from this distribution. The easiest way I know of is to notice that a multinomial distribution with k categories can be repeatedly decomposed into binomial distributions by grouping categories together: instead of directly how many selections there are for each of the k categories, we express this as a sequence of questions: "How to split the budget between the first category and the other k-1?" We next ask "How to split the remainder between the second category and the other k-2?", etc.

So the top level binomial has category (subbudget) 1 vs. everything else. Decide the number of dollars that go to subbudget 1 by taking 1 sample from a binomial distribution with parameters n = budget and p = 1/n (how to do this is described here); this will produce some number 0 <= x[1] <= n. To find the number of dollars that go to subbudget 2, take 1 sample from a binomial distribution on the remaining money, i.e. using parameters n = budget - x[1] and p = 1/(n-1). After getting subbudget 2's amount x[2], subbudget 3's will be found using parameters n = budget - x[1] - x[2] and p = 1/(n-2), and so on.

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Downvoter: care to comment? –  j_random_hacker Oct 23 '13 at 11:59
    
Thanks for answering, but I feel this approach hard to understand/implement. –  Clive Oct 23 '13 at 18:35
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Let me demonstrate my algorithm using an example:

Assume budget = 100, n = 5, min = 10

Initialize the array to:

[10, 10, 10, 10, 10] => current sum = 50

Generate a random integer ranging from 0 to 50 (50 is the result of budget - current sum):

Say the random integer is 20 and update the array:

[30, 10, 10, 10, 10] => current sum = 70

Generate a random integer ranging from 0 to 30 (30 is the result of budget - current sum):

Say the random integer is 5 and update the array:

[30, 15, 10, 10, 10] => current sum = 75

Repeat the process above and the last element is whatever is left.

Finally, shuffle the array to get the final result.

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all elements in the array don't have the same distribution in your algorithm. The last element has very little chance to get any extra bonus besides min –  Clive Oct 23 '13 at 1:22
    
@Clive It works for a set. In the case of an array, you might need to shuffle the array to get the result. –  Terry Li Oct 23 '13 at 1:28
    
@TerryLi: This might still be an OK approach, but it definitely gives a different distribution than the OP's current code, even if you shuffle the numbers. That's because it's equally likely to choose to add 50 to some element as it is to add 5, when the OP's code is much more likely to add a number near budget/n than a number far from this. –  j_random_hacker Oct 23 '13 at 2:08
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Integrating @Hynek -Pichi- Vychodil's idea and my original algorithm, I came up with the following algorithm that runs in O(n) and all rounding errors are uniformly distributed to the array:

private int[] distribute(int budget, int n, int min) {
  int[] subBudgets = new int[n];
  for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
    subBudgets[i] = min;
  }
  budget -= n * min;
  if (budget > 3 * n) {
    double[] rands = new double[n];
    double sum = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
      rands[i] = random.nextDouble();
      sum += rands[i];
    }
    for (int i =0; i < n; i++) {
      double additionalBudget = budget / sum * rands[i];
      subBudgets[i] += additionalBudget;
      budget -= additionalBudget;
    }
  }
  while (budget > 0) {
    subBudgets[random.nextInt(n)]++;
    budget--;
  }
  return subBudgets;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This has a bug whenever min > 0: your 3rd for loop subtracts subBudgets[i] from budget, ignoring the fact that subBudgets[i] contains min more than the rounded value of budget / sum * rands[i]. –  j_random_hacker Oct 23 '13 at 18:55
    
Good catch! Thanks! I've fixed it in place. –  Clive Oct 23 '13 at 19:55
    
@Clive See mine answer for simpler implementation. –  Hynek -Pichi- Vychodil Oct 23 '13 at 22:52
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