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I want to do several operations on an array in a specific order. Each unit of behavior is in it's own method, and I have something like this:

def build_array_of_cool_employees
  employees = fetch_all_employees
  employees = remove_strange_employees_from employees
  employees = add_ideal_employee_to employees
  employees = sort_by_awesomeness employees
end

I was wondering if there's a better way. I feel like I'm missing some feature which could make my code nicer. Am I?

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Shouldn't each method be taking the array from the previous line as an argument? –  depa Oct 23 '13 at 1:38
    
Yes, in my example each method takes the result of the previous statement as an argument. –  jjfine Oct 23 '13 at 14:19
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4 Answers 4

You could create a separate class with chain-able methods. Something like this:

class EmployeeBuilder
  attr_reader :employees

  def initialize
    @employees = []
  end

  def fetch_all
    @employees.push(:qux, :baz, :bar)
    self
  end

  def remove_strange
    @employees.delete(:qux)
    self
  end

  def add_ideal
    @employees.push(:foo)
    self
  end

  def sort
    @employees.reverse!
    self
  end
end

And call it like this:

def build_array_of_cool_employees
  builder = EmployeeBuilder.new
  builder.fetch_all.remove_strange.add_ideal.sort.employees
end

build_array_of_cool_employees
#=> [:foo, :bar, :baz]
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In your case, you should use method chaining. You can subclass Array if you do not want to pollute the Array class.

class Employees < Array
  def self.cool
    fetch_all
    .remove_strange
    .add_ideal
    .sort_by_awesomeness
  end
  def self.fetch_all
    new(...)
  end
  def remove_strange
    ...
    self
  end
  def add_ideal
    ...
    self
  end
  def sort_by_awesomeness
    ...
    self
  end
end

Employees.cool # => ...
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this might read slightly nicer depending on how you feel about method chaining, but requires array to be a extended, and you then can call your custom methods on the array directly how you see fit. Better yet would be to have an employees list object and then manipulate that, but the idea is similar.

class Array
    def sort_by_awesomeness
        #your sort
    end

    def  add_ideal_employee(cool_employee)
        self.push(cool_employee)
    end 
    def remove_strange_employees(uncool_employees)
        uncool_employees.each do |uncool_employee|
            self.delete(uncool_employee)
        end 
        # return self here to continue the method chaining
        return self
    end
end

def build_array_of_cool_employees
  employees = fetch_all_employees.add_ideal_employee(cool_employee).remove_strange_employees(uncool_employees).sort_by_awesomeness
end
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1  
Dan, note self. is not needed. jjfine: What Dan has done is often called "Monkeypathching": changing one of Ruby's predefined classes at runtime (which is possible because all Ruby's classes are open). In some languages (where this can be done), the practice is viewed with disdain. Not so in Ruby--I understand Rails monkeypatches quite a bit. It is potentially dangerous, however. –  Cary Swoveland Oct 22 '13 at 23:17
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It depends on how your methods are implemented. If they modify the original array you could do something like this:

fetch_all_employees.tap do |employees|
  remove_strange_employees_from(employees)
  add_ideal_employee_to(employees)
  sort_by_awesomeness(employees)
end

Note that methods like delete_if or push modify the original array, so if you are using them in the implementation of your methods it should just work.

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