Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Working on a Python project for CS1, and I have come accross a strange issue that neither I or my roomate can figure out. The general scope of the code is to fill in a grid of 0s with shapes of a certain size using numbers to fill the space, and we have to check along the way to make sure we arent putting shapes in places there there are already shapes. I have two functions here, both do virtually the same thing, but for whatever reason when falsechecker returns the list it returns it as a NoneType. Why is this happening?

def falseChecker(binList, r, c, size):
    sCheck = isSpaceFree(binList, r, c, size)
    if sCheck == True:
        for x in range(c, c+size):
            for y in range(r, r+size):
                binList[x][y] = size
        return binList
    else:
        c += 1
        if c > len(binList):
            c = 0
            r += 1
            if r > len(binList):
                return binList
        falseChecker(binList, r, c, size)





def iChecker(binList, blockList):
    r = 0
    c = 0
    for i in blockList:
        check = isSpaceFree(binList, r, c, i)
        if check == True:
            for x in range(c, c+i):
                for y in range(r, r+i):
                    binList[x][y] = i
            c += 1
            if c > len(binList):
                c = 0
                r += 1
                if r > len(binList):
                    return binList
        else:
            binList = falseChecker(binList, r, c, i)

    return binList

main()
share|improve this question
3  
@Everybody: Is there a canonical duplicate for the common "I wrote a recursive function but didn't return the value from one of the recursive calls" question? –  DSM Oct 23 '13 at 0:12
2  
As a side note, if sCheck: is better than if sCheck == True: in almost every situation (including this one). –  abarnert Oct 23 '13 at 0:14
    
@abarnert "almost"? Is there any situation where == True is preferred? –  lvc Oct 23 '13 at 0:15
    
@lvc: Once upon a time, I was using a badly-designed package that wrapped up a C library with functions that returned True for success but a negative integer error code for failure. I wrote a module that wrapped all of the calls and checked == True else raised an exception with the number, to hide the horrible API from the rest of my code, with in a comment explaining what it was doing, and filed a bug against the package. (In case you're curious, the upstream fix was to return a tuple of True or False and 0 or a negative error code, which was slightly less horrible…) –  abarnert Oct 23 '13 at 17:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In the case where sCheck == True is false, you don't return anything. And in Python, a function that doesn't explicitly return anything returns None.

If you were trying to recursively call yourself and return the result, you wanted this:

return falseChecker(binList, r, c, size)
share|improve this answer

The recursive line:

falseChecker(binList, r, c, size)

needs to be

return falseChecker(binList, r, c, size)

or the recursed function ends, and the outer function keeps going since it hasn't returned yet. It then finishes without returning, and so returns None.

share|improve this answer

You need a return at the end of falseChecker:

def falseChecker(binList, r, c, size):
    sCheck = isSpaceFree(binList, r, c, size)
    if sCheck == True:
        for x in range(c, c+size):
            for y in range(r, r+size):
                binList[x][y] = size
        return binList
    else:
        c += 1
        if c > len(binList):
            c = 0
            r += 1
            if r > len(binList):
                 return binList

        #################################
        return falseChecker(binList, r, c, size)
        #################################

In Python, functions return None by default if they come to the end of themselves without returning. Furthermore, when falseChecker is run for the first time, if sCheck is False, then it will execute the else block. This code block doesn't contain a return. Because of this, the ultimate return value of falseChecker will be None.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.