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I'm looking at a piece of Java code that contains:

User rv = tmp != null && tmp.size() > 0 ? tmp.get(0) : null;

I'm not very strong with Java syntax. My interpretation is that rv = tmp as long as tmp is null tmp's size is > 0, or else it equals null. Am I correct?

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3  
This is something you could test to find out on your own. –  Paul Bellora Oct 23 '13 at 2:13
1  
Probably if I wrote this I would use brackets to make it easier for a junior programmer to understand User rv = (tmp != null && tmp.size() > 0) ? tmp.get(0) : null; –  Scary Wombat Oct 23 '13 at 2:16

4 Answers 4

Here is the "anatomy" of this expression:

rv =                                // assignment of a conditional expression
    (tmp != null && tmp.size() > 0) // condition
?   tmp.get(0)                      // on true
:   null;                           // on false

This is a common way of ensuring that there would be no exception accessing element zero of the list: the condition ensures that tmp is not null, and also that the size is one or more.

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Note that the code is almost illegible and needs parentheses at a minimum. –  chrylis Oct 23 '13 at 2:14
    
For added background information regarding ternary operators in java, click here (wikipedia article) and here (java tutorial) –  Paul Richter Oct 23 '13 at 2:16

It's a ternary conditional expression:

expr ? value-if-true : value-if-false

If expr is true, it evaluates to value-if-true, and otherwise it evaluates to value-if-valuse.

So, in this case, it's equivalent to:

 if (tmp != null && tmp.size() > 0) {
     rv = tmp.get(0);
 } else {
      rv = null;
 }
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rv = ((tmp != null && tmp.size() > 0) ? tmp.get(0) : null); 

if expression inside the inner brackets return true then rv will hold the value tmp.get(0) else it will hold the value null.

variable = expression ? a : b ;

is similar to

if expression == true 
  variable = a;
else 
   variable =b ;
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This is called a ternary statement.

Basically,

User rv = tmp != null && tmp.size() > 0 ? tmp.get(0) : null;

is a shorter way of writing:

        User rv;

        if (tmp != null && tmp.size() > 0)
            rv = tmp.get(0);
        else
            rv = null;

The ternary statement is not faster. Although, in some cases, using it makes your code more readable.

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in some cases, using it makes your code more readable. - Not in this case though (if it had parentheses it would be better) –  Scary Wombat Oct 23 '13 at 2:21

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