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I'm trying to plot some data in R using scatter plot. Here's the code I had for plotting

data <- read.table(filename, header=FALSE);
colnames(data) <- c("xlabel", "ylabel", "xvalue", "yvalue", "class");   
df <- data.frame(data["xlabel"], data["ylabel"],data["xvalue"], data["yvalue"], data["class"]);
with(df, plot(xvalue, yvalue,       
    pch=c(16,17)[class],
    col=c("red", "blue", "green")[class],
    main="Tittle",
))

#label the nodes    
with(df, text(xvalue+300, yvalue, cex=0.5, sprintf("(%s, %s)", xlabel, ylabel)));

However, when 2 nodes are closed to each other, or even worse overlapping, as seen in here, it's very hard to distinguish the nodes and their labels. So my questions are: 1. How can I set the stroke and fill color of nodes differently to distinguish the overlapping nodes? 2. Is there anyway to make the node labels behave smarter, such as adjusting their locations in case of overlapping? Maybe, there is some library available that allows that option?

Here's the data if you want to test it:

2 6 6990 4721 1 
2 7 6990 4643 2 
1 4 13653 3294 2 
3 7 4070 4643 1 
2 8 6990 6354 1 
3 8 4070 6354 1 
1 2 13653 6990 1 
1 7 13653 4643 2 
3 5 4070 3349 2 
1 8 13653 6354 1 
3 6 4070 4721 1 
2 4 6990 3294 2 
1 5 13653 3349 2 
1 6 13653 4721 1 
3 4 4070 3294 2 
2 5 6990 3349 2 
5 8 3349 6354 1 

Thanks,

share|improve this question
1  
Had you noticed that you define df to be identical to data? Try identical(data, df). – Richie Cotton Oct 23 '13 at 7:50
    
+1. Thank you. So, is it dataframe a data with specified column names? Sorry the basic concept question. I've just learned R and some concept are very confusing at first. – chepukha Oct 23 '13 at 14:19
    
A data.frame holds spreadsheet-like data. You can either think of it as a matrix where each column can be a different type, or as a non-nested list, where each element is a vector of the same length. – Richie Cotton Oct 23 '13 at 14:55
up vote 1 down vote accepted

A simple fix is to alternate placing labels on the left and right. I've ordered the dataset by x-value then y-value, so nearby points are near in the dataset.

library(plyr)
df <- arrange(df, xvalue, yvalue)
offset <- rep(c(-300, 300), length.out = nrow(df))

with(df, plot(xvalue, yvalue,       #as before
    pch=c(16,17)[class],
    col=c("red", "blue", "green")[class],
    main="Tittle",
))

with(df, text(xvalue + offset, yvalue, cex=0.5, sprintf("(%s, %s)", xlabel, ylabel)))

If you use lattice or ggplot (rather than base graphics) instead then the directlabels package has a direct.label function that automatically positions your labels.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, Richie. Your solution reduces significant overlapping. However, there's still overlapping. I'll try the directlabels package to see if it works better. – chepukha Oct 23 '13 at 14:13

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