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I have very little experience with LinkedLists and cannot figure out the logic for testing if a string is in one of the nodes. The program overall is waiting for clients to send DNS queries and then sending back a response in an infinite loop. What I would like to do is:

Determine if the LinkedList has the client requested hostname. If it is not there, add it to the LinkedList and after performing the lookup save the answer to the same node. If it is there, just give the client the answer I already looked up and stored in answer[].

Here is a simplified section of code:

struct queryCache {
    char* hostName;
    uint8_t answer[UDP_RECV_SIZE];
    struct queryCache* next;
};
struct queryCache* qcRoot;

int main (int argc, char** argv) {
    // ...unrelated code

    qcRoot = malloc(sizeof(struct queryCache));
    qcRoot->hostName = 0;
    qcRoot->next = 0;

    while (1) {
        // Wait for client with recvfrom()

        char* cqHostName;
        // Code that malloc()s and strcpy()s the client hostname into cqHostName

        // Determine if cqHostName is in the cache
        int hostNameInCache = 0;
        struct queryCache* currQC = qcRoot;
        while (currQC) {
            if (!strcmp(currQC->hostName, cqHostName)) {
                puts("In the cache");
                hostNameInCache = 1;
                break;
            }
            currQC = currQC->next;
        }

        // If cqHostName is not in the cache add its name
        if (!hostNameInCache) {
            currQC->hostName = malloc(strlen(cqHostName)+1);
            strcpy(currQC->hostName, cqHostName);
            printf("Added HOSTNAME: %s to the cache\n", cqHostName);

            currQC->next = malloc(sizeof(struct queryCache));
            currQC = currQC->next;
            currQC->hostName = 0;
            currQC->next = 0;
        }

        // Code that does a recursive DNS

        // Code that will copy the response into the appropriate answer[] of the LinkedList
    }
}

The program seems to just exit on after the first client request without giving an error. If I remove the LinkedList code it works just fine so I'm pretty sure what is going wrong has to do with how I am checking if a string is in the LinkedList.

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1  
You might want to step through the code line by line in a debugger. It will probably help you locate the problem. –  Joachim Pileborg Oct 23 '13 at 7:07
1  
By the way, you have a possible case of undefined behavior in your code. After the lookup loop, the variable currQC will be NULL, and yet you dereference it when creating a new entry. –  Joachim Pileborg Oct 23 '13 at 7:09
    
Oh, and you call strcmp with a NULL pointer as well, another case that will lead to undefined behavior. –  Joachim Pileborg Oct 23 '13 at 7:11
    
The solution is to test currCQ->next in the while loop then? –  asimes Oct 23 '13 at 7:13
    
Yes that's a start, but that's not all of your problems. –  Joachim Pileborg Oct 23 '13 at 7:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When hostNameInCache is 0, most likely currQC is NULL, so you can't defer it.

Change condition of your while loop as

#------------v
while (currQC->next) {
    if (!strcmp(currQC->hostName, cqHostName)) {
            puts("In the cache");
            hostNameInCache = 1;
            break;
        }
        currQC = currQC->next;
}
share|improve this answer
    
That did it, thank you –  asimes Oct 23 '13 at 7:19

According to your code, currQC is null when you attempt to do the currQC->hostName = malloc(strlen(cqHostName)+1);.

The answer you accepted happens to work in order to address this specific situation, indeed, but in the while loop, if you do while(currQC->next) then you miss checking the last item in the list.

So, that code, introduces another problem, not apparent immediately. I would suggest checking if the next element is null, instead and break if it is like in if (!currQC->next) break; else currQC=currQC->next.

EDIT: Of course, my suggestion means that you will want to replace the while loop with a do {}while(1); instead, since the while condition will no longer be tested ever.

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Thank you, that would have been a headache later –  asimes Oct 23 '13 at 7:31
    
I just added a conditional statement after the while loop to check the last one. Edit: Seemed to be a simple solution to maintain the working string check –  asimes Oct 23 '13 at 7:39
    
@asimes adding a condition after the loop does not solve the problem if you do not have the currQC to the last element in the list, so that you can add the new element. EDIT: Ah, you mean you kept the while(currQC->next) condition...Sure, that could do it, as well. –  ThunderGr Oct 23 '13 at 7:42
    
if (currQC->next && !strcmp(currQC->next->hostName, cqHostName)) –  asimes Oct 23 '13 at 7:43
    
@asimes This can cause you to miss an equality on the last item of the list, since the comparison will not be checked if currQC->next is 0. –  ThunderGr Oct 23 '13 at 7:46

In C there are generally two ways to handle a single-linked list: As a stack or as a queue.

When handling the list as a stack, you add new items at the head. When handling it as a queue, you add new items at the tail.


The simplest is the stack-method:

struct node
{
    int data;
    struct node *next;
};

...

struct node *head = NULL;

/* Add one node */
struct node *n1 = malloc(sizeof(struct node));
n1->data = 1;
n1->next = head;   /* This and the next line is what adds the node */
head = n1;

/* Add another node */
struct node *n2 = malloc(sizeof(struct node));
n2->data = 2;
n2->next = head;   /* This and the next line is what adds the node */
head = n2;

After the above code, the list contains two nodes:

2 --> 1 --> NULL

For the queue method you need to keep track of the tail as well as the head:

struct node *head = NULL;
struct node *tail = NULL;

/* Add one node */
struct node *n1 = malloc(sizeof(struct node));
n1->data = 1;
n1->next = NULL;

if (tail != NULL)
    tail->next = n1;
else
{
    /* List is empty */
    head = tail = n1;
}

/* Add another node */
struct node *n2 = malloc(sizeof(struct node));
n2->data = 2;
n2->next = NULL;

if (tail != NULL)
    tail->next = n2;
else
{
    /* List is empty */
    head = tail = n2;
}

After this the list looks like

1 --> 2 --> NULL

I suggest you read this answer a couple of times, and think about how your handling of lists differ from the methods used here. I also suggest you use a debugger to step though your code, line by line, to see why your list handling will not work as expected.

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I thought it was the other way. You implement stack and queue using singly linked list. Mostly because I can mix both approaches in SLL which makes it more general. It's not that relevant, but I don't think it's correct. –  zubergu Oct 23 '13 at 7:37

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