Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have an old ObjectContext and few new DbContext in my project (i.e. BoundedContext for different purposes). Some time I need to commit changes from few of them in one transactions. In some cases I need to persist data from ObjectContext and DbContext. In EF 5.0 to avoid of MSDC I write some wraper

public class ContextUnitOfWork
{
    List<IContext> ContextList;
    public ContextUnitOfWork()
    {
        ContextList = new List<IContext>(); 
    }
    public void RegisterContext(IContext Context)
    {
        ContextList.Add(Context);
    }
    public bool IsDisposed
    {
        get
        {
            return ContextList.Any(x => x.IsDisposed);
        }
    }
    public bool HasChangedEntities
    {
        get
        {
            return ContextList.Any(x => x.HasChangedEntities);
        }
    }
    public void Commit()
    {
        bool HasDbContext = ContextList.OfType<System.Data.Entity.DbContext>().Any();
        try
        {
            if (HasDbContext)
            {
                ContextList.ForEach(x =>
                {

                    if (x is System.Data.Entity.DbContext)
                    {
                        (x as System.Data.Entity.DbContext).Database.Connection.Open();
                    }
                    else if (x is System.Data.Objects.ObjectContext)
                    {
                        ((System.Data.Objects.ObjectContext)x).Connection.Open();
                    }

                });
            }

            using (var scope = new System.Transactions.TransactionScope(System.Transactions.TransactionScopeOption.Required,
    new System.Transactions.TransactionOptions { IsolationLevel = System.Transactions.IsolationLevel.ReadCommitted }))
            {
                ContextList.ForEach(x => x.Commit());
                scope.Complete();
            }
        }
        catch (System.Data.UpdateException uex)
        {
            var ErrorList = uex.StateEntries.Select(x => x.Entity).ToList(); 
        }
        finally
        {
            if (HasDbContext)
            {
                ContextList.ForEach(x =>
                {
                    if (x is System.Data.Entity.DbContext)
                    {
                        (x as System.Data.Entity.DbContext).Database.Connection.Close();
                    }
                    else if (x is System.Data.Objects.ObjectContext)
                    {
                        ((System.Data.Objects.ObjectContext)x).Connection.Close();
                    }
                });
            };

        }
    }
}

But in EntityFramework 6.0.1 it doesn't work. ObjectContext commit successfully, but when DbContext call SaveChanges() an Exception of type EntityException with text "The underlying provider failed on EnlistTransaction." And Inner Expection contains {"Network access for Distributed Transaction Manager (MSDTC) has been disabled. Please enable DTC for network access in the security configuration for MSDTC using the Component Services Administrative tool."}

Any Idea to commit contexts in one transaction and avoid MDTC exception?

share|improve this question
    
Inner exception in English "Network access for Distributed Transaction Manager (MSDTC) has been disabled. Please enable DTC for network access in the security configuration for MSDTC using the Component Services Administrative tool." Можешь поправить) –  shibormot Oct 23 '13 at 8:39

1 Answer 1

You are attempting to run everything in a local transaction which is very tricky even with multiple contexts of the same type. The reason for this is that you cannot have multiple open connections with the same local transaction. And very often a new connection will be opened for the next context if the previous context is still alive. This will trigger a promotion of the local transaction to a distributed transaction.

My experience with EF is that it only re-uses the current connection when the connectionstring (the normal one inside the entityconnectionstring) is EXACTLY identical. If there is a single difference, the transaction will be promoted to a distributed transaction, which must be enabled by the system, which in your case, it is not.

Also, if you are already executing a query, and are still reading results from that query, that starting another query at the same time, will (of course) require another connection, and therefore, the local transaction will be promoted to a distributed transaction.

Can you check if the connection strings are identical? I would still be surprised if current connection is re-used though.

share|improve this answer
    
Connection strings absolutely identical. It looks like "Data Source=MyDataBase;Initial Catalog=MyDataBase;Integrated Security=True;Pooling=True;Application Name=MyApp" –  GraySerg Oct 23 '13 at 10:07
    
And, as i mention above, with EF 5.0 it works. –  GraySerg Oct 23 '13 at 10:13
    
If not open connection manually and if connection strings ABSOLUTLY IDENTICAL it works. Thank you Maarten. –  GraySerg Oct 23 '13 at 10:27
    
You're welcome. Updated my answer a bit. –  Maarten Oct 23 '13 at 10:43
    
If you are opening the connections manually, and postpone the closing of the connections until the commit, than indeed, multiple open connections are needed, and that requires a distributed transaction. A local transaction cannot handle that. –  Maarten Oct 23 '13 at 11:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.