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I'm new to C# and experimenting with it.

I have a super-class Form with a property FormID. Form is inherited by other 4 sub-classes.

Form-> DeployForm -> SystemOut and Form_> Colection -> SystemIn.

How do I access the property FormID from the sub-classes? (DeployForm, SystemOutColection, Collectiom and SystemIn?)

//  Superclass - Form.
public class Form
{
    private int _FormID;
    private string _UserName;
    private string _ComputerName;
    private string _AssetTag;
    private string _Department;
    private string _Status;

    // Below are the associations I linked
    // to other classes that don't require attribute FormID.
    private FormCategory _differentiateBy;
    private CheckList _referencesToChecklist;
    private Staff _referencesToStaff;

    public Form()
    {
        _differentiateBy = new FormCategory();
        _referencesToChecklist = new CheckList();
        _referencesToStaff = new Staff();
    }

    public int FormID
    {
        get { return _FormID; }
        set { _FormID = value; }
    }
}

// Sub Class - DeploymentForm
public class DeploymentForm : Form
{
    private DateTime _DeployDate;
    private int _DeployBy;
    private DateTime _SetupDate;
    private int _SetupBy;

    public DeploymentForm()
    {
    }

    public DateTime DeployDate
    {
        get { return _DeployDate; }
        set { _DeployDate = value; }
    }

    public int DeployBy
    {
    get { return _DeployBy; }
    set { _DeployBy = value; }
    }

    public DateTime SetupDate
    {
        get { return _SetupDate; }
        set { _SetupDate = value; }
    }

    public int SetupBy
    {
        get { return _SetupBy; }
        set { _SetupBy = value; }
    }
}

// etc...
share|improve this question
    
Use ' this.FormID' or 'base.FormID' inside derived classes nothing more. –  Alessandro D'Andria Oct 23 '13 at 9:42
    
Since you are new, I've taken the liberty of making your question readable. This will make a good answer much more likely. If I have indaverntly changed the meaning, I apologise. Please edit the question avoiding ambiguity. –  Jodrell Oct 23 '13 at 9:57
    
Thank you @Jorell, thanks for helping me to rephrase the question. –  AlphaRomeo69 Oct 24 '13 at 1:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Because the FormID property has a public scope it will be accesible in the sub-class as if it were a normal member. Just do,

this.FormID

EDIT In response to the OP's comment.

If the constructor in the sub class is public default (no parameters) and empty, like yours, then it is redundant. The empty public default constructor can and should be removed.

If you want to make a public default constructor that does something, just do it. The default constructor on the base class, if one exists, will be implicity called when you instantiate the sub class.

If the base class has no accesible default constructor, or you want to call a non default constructor with certain parameters you can specify the call in your sub class constructor definition. e.g.

public class BaseClass
{
    protected BaseClass(int p)
    {
    }
}

public class SubClass : BaseClass
{
    public SubClass()
        : base(int.MinValue)
    {
    }

    public SubClass(int p)
        : base(p)
    {
    }
}

Rememeber, if a class has no constructor, a public default empty constructor is implied. If any constructor is specified, the implication is removed.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi @jodrell do I need to do anything about the constructor in the deploymentForm class? Am I correct to do this? //declare a attribute in deploymentForm Class to hold "formID" from Form class? private Form _FormID; Public Form FormID { get{} set{} } –  AlphaRomeo69 Oct 24 '13 at 2:04
    
@AlphaRomeo69, see my edit, its a seperate question really. –  Jodrell Oct 24 '13 at 10:25
    
@Jorell Thank you very much for explaining it to me and I apologies that I posted my second question over here. –  AlphaRomeo69 Oct 25 '13 at 1:18
    
@AlphaRomeo69, feel free to vote/accept. –  Jodrell Oct 25 '13 at 8:16

You just reference it like any other property:

DeploymentForm deploymentForm = new DeploymentForm();
var x = deploymentForm.FormID;
share|improve this answer
    
Hi @chrisP, do I need to do anything about the constructor in the deploymentForm class? Am I correct to do this? //declare a attribute in deploymentForm Class to hold "formID" from Form class? private Form _FormID; Public Form FormID { get{} set{} } –  AlphaRomeo69 Oct 24 '13 at 1:18

You don't need anything special:

public class DeployForm : Form
{
    public void DoStuff()
    {
         System.Console.WriteLine("{0}", FormID);
    }
}

As an aside, you want to learn about auto properties in C# - there's no need to have an explicit backing field for every property.

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