Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

while mocking an object using parametrized constructor, if the property being initialized within the constructor is virtual, Moq does not set property value. But if it is non-virtual property, Moq sets the value.

Following is my class I wants to mock.

public class Activity
{
    private Activity() {}
    public Activity(string code, string description, string option)
    {
        if(string.IsNullOrEmpty(code)) throw  new ArgumentNullException("code");
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(option)) throw new ArgumentNullException("option");

        Code = code;
        Description = description;
        Option = option;
    }

    public virtual string Code { get; private set; }
    public virtual string Description { get; private set; }
    public virtual string Option { get; private set; }

}

This is how I try to mock it:

    [TestMethod]
    public void It_Creates_Mock_For_A_Class()
    {
        var mock = new Mock<Activity>("Code 1", null, "Option");
        Assert.IsNotNull(mock.Object);
        Assert.AreEqual("Code 1", mock.Object.Code);
    }

The test method fails saying: Assert.AreEqual failed. Expected:. Actual:<(null)>.

But if I remove the virtual keyword from all the property, it works and passes the test case.

I have to keep the properties virtual because of Entity Framework.

Any clue? How to get around this problem?

share|improve this question
    
Actually your test tests MOQ framework instead of testing your implementation of constructor. What do you want to test? Do you ask about strange MOQ behaviour only? –  Ilya Palkin Oct 23 '13 at 21:14
    
@IlyaPalkin Above was just an example to demonstrate the problem I was facing with Moq in case of virtual/non-virtual property. Due to this problem many of the behavioural test cases I was trying to write were failing, as internally the private methods of the Activity Class uses these properties and finding them null. –  101V Oct 24 '13 at 11:24

1 Answer 1

Found out that if "CallBase" property is set to true, it solved the problem.

By looking at the assembly in Object Browser, the summary says:

Summary: Whether the base member virtual implementation will be called for mocked classes if no setup is matched. Defaults to false.

The code that works:

    [TestMethod]
    public void It_Creates_Mock_For_A_Class()
    {
        var mock = new Mock<Activity>("Code 1", null, "Option");
        mock.CallBase = true;
        Assert.IsNotNull(mock.Object);
        Assert.AreEqual("Code 1", mock.Object.Code);
    }
share|improve this answer
    
I have not used 'mock.CallBase = true;' before but it is something I definitely will use in the future. Anyway I think that there is an other better solution. –  Ilya Palkin Oct 23 '13 at 21:21
    
@IlyaPalkin Can you please share the better solution. –  101V Oct 24 '13 at 11:25
1  
If you test a class that depends on 'Activity' then you create 'Mock<Activity>' and set up its public properties or methods. In this case a unit-under-test is an instance of that class. If you test 'Activity' then you should test an instance of 'Activity' type. All private methods are tested through the public methods usually. –  Ilya Palkin Oct 24 '13 at 12:12

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.