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i am completely lost.

I try to pass two optional arguments to a function in fortran, and those two are arrays of an unknown length. The code compiles fine, but when the program run, it crashes during the evaluation of the PRESENT(arg) function. There is no error message in the command line, instead just the windows error notification pops up, and tells me "main.exe has stopped working" Any ideas on how to solve this?

Here is the code, I deleted everything that is not necessary.

MODULE types
  ! Underlying data types: Bra, Ket, and Oper
  type bra
    complex*8, dimension(:,:), allocatable  :: dat
    integer*4                               :: typ ! = "Bra"
    integer*4, dimension(2)                 :: dims
  end type bra

  type ket
    complex*8, dimension(:,:), allocatable  :: dat
    integer*4                               :: typ ! = "Ket"
    integer*4, dimension(2)                 :: dims
  end type ket

  type oper
    complex*8, dimension(:,:), allocatable  :: dat
    integer*4                               :: typ ! = "Operator"
    integer*4, dimension(2)                 :: dims
  end type oper
END MODULE types

MODULE basics
  ! The types are declared in an extra module, to be imported here
  ! Otherwise it is not possible to use derived types in procedures
  use types

  interface operator (*)
    ! "Quantum" multiplication
    procedure otk ! Operator  Times Ket         O  *|B > = |C>
  end interface

  CONTAINS
  ! Fock state
  function fock(N,M)
    ! N is the dimension of the underlying array
    ! M is the number of photons inside
    ! M=1 is vacuum
    integer*4 :: N,M
    type(ket) :: fock

    ! Check is the passed dimensions are okay
    if (N<2 .or. M<0 .or. M > N-1) then
      print*,'Invalid input while making a fock state'
      print*,'N=',N,'M=',M
      stop
    end if

    ! Allocate and initilaize with zeros
    allocate(fock%dat(N,1))
    fock%dat = (0d0,0d0)

    ! Now actually make the state by replacing a zero with 1
    fock%dat(M+1,1) = (1d0,0d0)

    ! Set type of the object to 'ket'
    fock%typ = 2

    ! Set the dimensions
    fock%dims = [N,1]
  end function fock

  ! Identity matrix
  function qeye(N)
    integer*4   :: N,i
    type(oper)  :: qeye

    ! Allocate and initilaize with zeros
    allocate(qeye%dat(N,N))
    qeye%dat = (0d0,0d0)

    ! Set diagonal elements to 1
    do i = 1,N
      qeye%dat(i,i) = (1d0,0d0)
    end do

    ! Set type of the object to 'oper'
    qeye%typ = 4

    ! Set the dimensions
    qeye%dims = [N,N]
  end function qeye

  ! Operator Times Ket
  function otk(left, right)
    type(oper), intent(in)  :: left
    type(ket), intent(in)   :: right
    type(ket)               :: otk
    ! If the operator is as wide, as the state is high, do matrix multiplication
    if (left%dims(2) == right%dims(1)) then
      ! Result is a Ket vector again
      allocate(otk%dat(left%dims(1),1))
      otk%dat = matmul(left%dat,right%dat)
      ! Also set data type and dimensions of the result
      otk%dims = [right%dims(1),1]
      otk%typ = 2
      return
    else
      print*,'You are trying to use an operator on a ket of inconsistent dimensions'
      print*,left%dims,'and',right%dims
      stop
    end if
  end function otk
end module basics

MODULE RK
  ! Import modules to work with quantum objects
  use types
  use basics

  contains
  subroutine rungekutta(state,HAM,times,results)
    ! In-/Output:
    ! Starting state, also final state
    type(ket)             :: state 
    ! Function delivering time dependent hamiltonian
    type(oper), external  :: HAM 
    ! Array with times at which to do calculations
    real*8, dimension(:)  :: times
    ! Placeholder for the length of a given time step
    real*8                :: t_0, t_step
    ! Optional array of ket states to hold all the intermediate results
    type(ket), dimension(:),optional  :: results 

    ! Variables for internal calculations
    type(ket) :: psi0

    ! Looping coefficients
    integer*8 :: ii
    ! Start of the calculations
    ! (The actual Runge-Kutta method is different, but not needed now)
    results(1) = state
    do ii = 1, size(times)-1
      t_0     = times(ii)
      t_step  = times(ii+1) - times(ii)

      psi0    = results(ii)
      results(ii+1) = HAM(t_0) * psi0   
    end do

    ! Save the last calculated state to the input/output variable
    state = results(size(results)) 
  end subroutine rungekutta
end MODULE RK

module dummy
  ! Import modules to work with quantum objects
  use types
  use basics

  CONTAINS
  ! Define Hamiltonian function

  function testHAM(t, freqs, coefs)
    type(oper)  :: testHAM
    real*8      :: t

    ! Optional variables is the Hamiltonian is time dependent
    real*8, dimension(:), optional  :: freqs, coefs

    testHAM = qeye(2)
    ! Variable part
    if (.NOT.present(freqs)) then
      print*,'gotcha'
    end if
  end function testHAM
end module dummy

program main
  ! Import modules to work with quantum objects
  use types
  use basics
  use RK

  ! Import hamilton definition
  use dummy

  IMPLICIT NONE

  ! Define variables
  type(ket)              :: start, goal
  real*8, dimension(:), allocatable  :: timesarr
  integer*4              :: N,i,M,j,k,l,mm
  type(ket), dimension(:), allocatable  :: results

  ! Set number of steps, and the total time
  N = 5000
  allocate(timesarr(N))
  timesarr = [0d0,1d0]

  start=fock(2,0)

  ! Allocate the vector holding the results
  allocate(results(N))
  results = start

  call rungekutta(start,testHAM,timesarr,results)
end program main

I am using the optional keyword also with the "results" array, and somewhere else, and it works fine. I would really appreciate any help, because I am really not in the mood to wrok around that stuff, because it would make the code even more messy :)

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
    
The main program is really just there to show you how I pass the arguments, or actually, not pass. I am pretty sure the problem is somewhere in the function. –  Maxim Moloshenko Oct 23 '13 at 12:28
2  
I don't think anyone is going to be able to help you because you didn't include types, basic and RK in the above. Do you understand the idea of minimum working example? –  Kyle Kanos Oct 23 '13 at 12:37
    
Nor did you include the actual error you are getting. Please update with both a compilable example that produces the error and the associated error. –  Kyle Kanos Oct 23 '13 at 12:40
    
Okay, will do now. I just hoped that maybe I overlooked something simple in the syntax, and someone will spot the error like that –  Maxim Moloshenko Oct 23 '13 at 13:13
1  
I cutted-and-pasted your code, it compiles and executes without a fault. I'm running Intel 14.0.0.103 under VS2010 on a 64-bit installation of Windows 7. –  High Performance Mark Oct 23 '13 at 14:59

2 Answers 2

A procedure with optional arguments requires an explicit interface for the procedure to be accessible in any scope where the procedure is referenced.

The code presented doesn't meet this requirement.

Note the procedure is referenced twice.

In execution order, the first reference - when the testHAM procedure is associated with the HAM dummy argument in call to rungekutta in the main program - is ok - an explicit interface is available (the identifier is for a module procedure - so the explicit interface is automatic).

But the second reference in execution order - when the HAM dummy procedure is invoked - is not ok. The dummy argument is declared "only" using a type declaration statement with the external attribute. That does not give a procedure an explicit interface.

(With the language as it is - my opinion is that if you have to (or even just "should") use an external attribute then your coding exhibits poor style.)

The correct immediate approach is to use on of the methods of giving the dummy procedure argument an explicit interface - perhaps via an interface block or a procedure declaration statement with a proc-interface specification.

If the desired, relevant characteristics of the interface of the dummy procedure then don't match the actual interface of the testHAM procedure (here assuming that the rungekutta procedure doesn't care or want to know about the optional arguments), then you may need to use a wrapper procedure or similar approach to forward the procedure invocation on.

Edit to add: While it is not required by the standard - it would be reasonable to expect a warning from a compiler for this usage. While association of the procedure with optional arguments with a dummy procedure with an implicit interface is "legal", it is then impossible for the dummy procedure to then be used in anyway. This might be worth discussing with the vendor of your Fortran processor.

share|improve this answer

lanH is of course right. An explicite solution looks like this:

MODULE types
  ! Underlying data types: Bra, Ket, and Oper
  type bra
    complex*8, dimension(:,:), allocatable  :: dat
    integer*4                               :: typ ! = "Bra"
    integer*4, dimension(2)                 :: dims
  end type bra

  type ket
    complex*8, dimension(:,:), allocatable  :: dat
    integer*4                               :: typ ! = "Ket"
    integer*4, dimension(2)                 :: dims
  end type ket

  type oper
    complex*8, dimension(:,:), allocatable  :: dat
    integer*4                               :: typ ! = "Operator"
    integer*4, dimension(2)                 :: dims
  end type oper
END MODULE types

MODULE basics
  ! The types are declared in an extra module, to be imported here
  ! Otherwise it is not possible to use derived types in procedures
  use types

  interface operator (*)
    ! "Quantum" multiplication
    procedure otk ! Operator  Times Ket         O  *|B > = |C>
  end interface

  CONTAINS
  ! Fock state
  function fock(N,M)
    ! N is the dimension of the underlying array
    ! M is the number of photons inside
    ! M=1 is vacuum
    integer*4 :: N,M
    type(ket) :: fock

    ! Check is the passed dimensions are okay
    if (N<2 .or. M<0 .or. M > N-1) then
      print*,'Invalid input while making a fock state'
      print*,'N=',N,'M=',M
      stop
    end if

    ! Allocate and initilaize with zeros
    allocate(fock%dat(N,1))
    fock%dat = (0d0,0d0)

    ! Now actually make the state by replacing a zero with 1
    fock%dat(M+1,1) = (1d0,0d0)

    ! Set type of the object to 'ket'
    fock%typ = 2

    ! Set the dimensions
    fock%dims = [N,1]
  end function fock

  ! Identity matrix
  function qeye(N)
    integer*4   :: N,i
    type(oper)  :: qeye

    ! Allocate and initilaize with zeros
    allocate(qeye%dat(N,N))
    qeye%dat = (0d0,0d0)

    ! Set diagonal elements to 1
    do i = 1,N
      qeye%dat(i,i) = (1d0,0d0)
    end do

    ! Set type of the object to 'oper'
    qeye%typ = 4

    ! Set the dimensions
    qeye%dims = [N,N]
  end function qeye

  ! Operator Times Ket
  function otk(left, right)
    type(oper), intent(in)  :: left
    type(ket), intent(in)   :: right
    type(ket)               :: otk
    ! If the operator is as wide, as the state is high, do matrix multiplication
    if (left%dims(2) == right%dims(1)) then
      ! Result is a Ket vector again
      allocate(otk%dat(left%dims(1),1))
      otk%dat = matmul(left%dat,right%dat)
      ! Also set data type and dimensions of the result
      otk%dims = [right%dims(1),1]
      otk%typ = 2
      return
    else
      print*,'You are trying to use an operator on a ket of inconsistent dimensions'
      print*,left%dims,'and',right%dims
      stop
    end if
  end function otk
end module basics

MODULE RK
  ! Import modules to work with quantum objects
  use types
  use basics

  contains
  subroutine rungekutta(state,HAM,times,results)
    ! In-/Output:
    ! Starting state, also final state
    type(ket)             :: state 
    ! PeMa: Function delivering time dependent hamiltonian (now a correct interface)
    interface
    function HAM(t,freqs,coefs)
       use types
       ! type(oper),external :: HAM
       ! Edit (see comments) :
       type(oper) :: HAM
       real(8)      :: t
       real(8), dimension(:),allocatable,optional :: freqs, coefs
    end function
    end interface

    ! PeMa: define testing arrays to test the otional arguments:
    real(8), dimension(:),allocatable :: a, b

    ! Array with times at which to do calculations
    real*8, dimension(:)  :: times
    ! Placeholder for the length of a given time step
    real*8                :: t_0, t_step
    ! Optional array of ket states to hold all the intermediate results
    type(ket), dimension(:),optional  :: results 

    ! Variables for internal calculations
    type(ket) :: psi0

    ! Looping coefficients
    integer*8 :: ii
    ! Start of the calculations
    ! (The actual Runge-Kutta method is different, but not needed now)

    !PeMa: my testing arrays
    allocate(a(1:2))
    allocate(b(1:2))
    a=(/1d0,3d0/)
    b=(/2d0,4d0/)

    results(1) = state
    do ii = 1, size(times)-1
      t_0     = times(ii)
      t_step  = times(ii+1) - times(ii)

      psi0    = results(ii)

      !PeMa: use one of the next to lines and you see in the output that it's working now:
      results(ii+1) = HAM(t_0,a,b) * psi0   
      !results(ii+1) = HAM(t_0) * psi0   
    end do

    ! Save the last calculated state to the input/output variable
    state = results(size(results)) 
  end subroutine rungekutta
end MODULE RK

module dummy
  ! Import modules to work with quantum objects
  use types
  use basics

  CONTAINS
  ! Define Hamiltonian function

  function testHAM(t, freqs, coefs)
    type(oper)  :: testHAM
    real*8      :: t

    ! PeMa: Optional variables is the Hamiltonian is time dependent (I'm using allocatable to be sure about the 'position labeling' ... sorry can't say it better)
    real*8, dimension(:), allocatable,optional  :: freqs, coefs

    testHAM = qeye(2)
    ! Variable part
    !PeMa: I inserted some 'else' to test both possibilities: 
    if (.NOT.present(freqs)) then
      print*,'gotcha'
    else
      print*,freqs,coefs
    end if
  end function testHAM
end module dummy

program main
  ! Import modules to work with quantum objects
  use types
  use basics
  use RK

  ! Import hamilton definition
  use dummy

  IMPLICIT NONE

  ! Define variables
  type(ket)              :: start, goal
  real*8, dimension(:), allocatable  :: timesarr
  integer*4              :: N,i,M,j,k,l,mm
  type(ket), dimension(:), allocatable  :: results

  ! Set number of steps, and the total time (PeMa: 5 is enough ;-) )
  N = 5
  allocate(timesarr(N))
  timesarr = [0d0,1d0]

  start=fock(2,0)

  ! Allocate the vector holding the results
  allocate(results(N))
  results = start

  call rungekutta(start,testHAM,timesarr,results)
end program main

(Hopefully) all the points, where I changed something are labled with 'PeMa'. Now it's not only compiling (probably everywhere) but really doing what it's actually supposed to do. You can test this by commanding in and out the two lines with the different function calls in rungecutta. Hope I could help you! Best

share|improve this answer
1  
Your interface body for the dummy argument attempts to apply the external attribute to the function name. I think that is a constraint or scope violation and should not compile. –  IanH Oct 25 '13 at 0:55
    
Right, thanks! It's compiling and running properly with and without it. But still you are right, that's a left-over from the copy paste and doesn't make any sence. I'll remove it. Additionally I think one should use the f90 std, to define the variables (i.e. real(8) instead of real*8). Some compilers might have problems with the fortran77 way. –  PeMa Oct 25 '13 at 7:20
    
Strictly speaking real(8) isn't standard-conforming since kind identifiers are not mandated by the standards and current compilers do show variations in their interpretation . –  High Performance Mark Oct 25 '13 at 13:14
    
@HighPerformanceMark Strictly it is standard conforming in syntax, but unspecified in meaning. –  IanH Oct 27 '13 at 10:03
    
@IanH: you're even stricter than I am. Thanks for the discipline. –  High Performance Mark Oct 28 '13 at 21:01

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