Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

my script reads something like this:

$(window).bind('popstate', function() {
    //some code
    //few more lines of code
});

This function works perfectly as intended in Chrome and Safari browsers. But Firefox for some reason ignores this function and does not work as intended.

share|improve this question
2  
Use on() and not bind() –  epascarello Oct 23 '13 at 15:10
    
Works for me using the demo from MDN: jsfiddle.net/55T2G You need to provide code that replicates the issue. SSCCE.org –  user2736012 Oct 23 '13 at 15:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Instead of using:

$(window).bind('popstate', function() {
    //some code
    //few more lines of code
});

You can use:

window.onpopstate = function() {
    //some code
    //few more lines of code
}

As firefox is using W3C defined rules for history API, so you have to use this for firefox and it works in chrome, safari and other browsers as well.

share|improve this answer

Note that just calling history.pushState() or history.replaceState() won't trigger a popstate event. The popstate event is only triggered by doing a browser action such as a click on the back button (or calling history.back() in JavaScript).

Browsers tend to handle the popstate event differently on page load. Chrome and Safari always emit a popstate event on page load, but Firefox doesn't.

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/Reference/Events/popstate

share|improve this answer

Are you saying Chrome and Safari fire the event on page load or when the browser's back button is clicked? If the former, it's because Chrome/Safari are out of compliance with the HTML5 specs => the event should never be fired on page load. Up-vote https://code.google.com/p/chromium/issues/detail?id=63040 to get Google to fix this.

share|improve this answer

Please do Check that if you have coded window.load() more than once OR have called .onload() more than one time. This probably may work for IE but not for Chrome and fireFox.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.