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I have created a small C program to cross the system limit of open file descriptors in Linux. But i can see the threshold does not cross.

Here is the C code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
int main()
{
  int i, fd[9000];
  for(i=0; i<9000; i++)
  {
   fd[i]=open("test.txt", O_RDWR);
  }
  while(1);
}

I would expect it to cross the limit and give me an error message. But if i run it in background and do lsof | wc -l it's not increasing.

What might be the reason?

share|improve this question
1  
Are you expecting the program or the system to print an error message? Why do you expect that rather than expecting open to return -1 to indicate failure, with no message to standard output or standard error? – Eric Postpischil Oct 23 '13 at 16:49
8  
How do you know it isn't failing on limit if you don't check open's return value? (because it does) – keltar Oct 23 '13 at 16:49
    
@EricPostpischil: I am checking lsof number and that's not increasing. by any chance more than 2k. – kingsmasher1 Oct 23 '13 at 16:51
    
Maybe lsof reports on the system file table, and your test.txt file has an open/link count of somewhere between 0 and 9000. Or even larger. BTW: if you don't know what the tool (lsof) reports, why would you use it? – wildplasser Oct 23 '13 at 16:56
up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is expected behavior. Once your program reaches its limit of open files, the open call returns -1, and no more files are opened.

The program merely completes the for loop, failing to open any more files. No messages are displayed.

Per information extracted from the OP, the limit of open files for their processes is 1024. lsof shows about 2000 files open because there are 1024 for their process and approximately a thousand more for other processes in the system.

A process is limited to the number of files specified by its soft limit. The soft limit is “soft” because it can be change, to values up to the hard limit. However, until the soft limit is changed, it is the limit of the number of open files.

share|improve this answer
1  
@kingsmasher1: lsof does not show any more files opened than the first 2000 because no more files are opened than the first 2000 (or whatever your limit is). – Eric Postpischil Oct 23 '13 at 16:54
1  
@kingsmasher1: “The default size” is not an answer to “What’s your ulimit -n?” An answer is a particular number, like 8192, 2048, or 256. – Eric Postpischil Oct 23 '13 at 16:59
1  
@kingsmasher1 huh?.. well, please read e.g. serverfault.com/questions/265155/soft-limit-vs-hard-limit – keltar Oct 23 '13 at 17:03
1  
@kingsmasher1 exactly because you've reached soft limit.... (1021+stdin+stdout+stderr==1024) – keltar Oct 23 '13 at 17:13
1  
@kingsmasher1: I am unfamiliar with the details on Linux. However: Files opened by system processes should not count against your process’ limit. Files opened by library-loading mechanisms in your process (even if inserting by the linker or loader, not by you explicitly) should count against your process, but they might not remain open. I am not sure whether memory-mapped files count as open files. – Eric Postpischil Oct 23 '13 at 17:29

First, you do not check return value of open. If you exceed limit of open descriptors, open returns -1 and sets errno to EMFILE.

Second, you are opening the same file. This may or may not count towards file descriptor limit.

share|improve this answer
    
It wont, if they had the same handle seeking would apply to both and such, they would represent the same file handle. – Alec Teal Oct 23 '13 at 16:53
    
I think you may be right. – el.pescado Oct 23 '13 at 16:58

This one works, and lsof ./test.txt | wc -l reports 1021 successful opens. (The program itself as well.)

#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <fcntl.h>

int main()
{
  int i, fd[9000];
  for(i=0; i<9000; i++)
  {
   fd[i]=open("test.txt", O_RDWR| O_CREAT, 0644);
   if (fd[i] < 0) break;
  }
 fprintf(stderr, "I is now %d\n" , i);
  while(1);
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

You should close files , when you use ulimit -n , you'll see maximnum numbers of open files, you can change it via ulimit -n NUMBER or ulimit C function from ulimit.h.

For your purpose you should use int getrlimit(int resource, struct rlimit *rlim); function.

share|improve this answer
    
I think you haven't understood my question. Why will i close files, when my intention is to check for threshold limit? – kingsmasher1 Oct 23 '13 at 16:58
    
Oh, i understand now, So i update my answer. – PersianGulf Oct 23 '13 at 17:47

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