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I have the foll prog

class Person {
  var $name;
  function Person () {

  }
}

$fred = new Person;
$fred->name = "Fred";
$barney =& new Person;
$barney->name = "Barney";

echo $barney->name;
echo $fred->name;

both the echo statements give the right same output ie "Fred" and "Barney" so whats the use of giving & while declaring $barney. what does "&" refer to here?

THanks

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3  
This is PHP4. Why are you not using PHP5? – Justin Johnson Dec 23 '09 at 19:34
up vote 0 down vote accepted

See References Explained in the PHP Manual.

Is there any particular reason why you are still using PHP4? It is no longer supported and PHP5s OOP is much more solid and capable.

share|improve this answer
    
I recently started learning PHP. – Josh Dec 23 '09 at 19:29
    
You are probably learning from outdated material then. PHP4 is dead. Have a look at the chapters Getting Started and Language Reference in the PHP manual. The manual is actually pretty good. – Gordon Dec 23 '09 at 19:48

It passes the variable as a reference but this is no longer needed in PHP5+.

share|improve this answer

References in PHP4 (http://www.php.net/manual/en/oop4.newref.php)

It means 'by reference.' It becomes synonymous, rather than a copy of (further reading). Also, the new way to write a constructor is not to use the same name as the class itself, instead, you use the __construct() function:

class Person {

  function __construct() {
    // setup shop
  }

}

Also, be sure to use Visiblity properly by assigning certain methods and properties as 'public,' 'private,' 'protected,' etc.

share|improve this answer
    
guess its ok if we dont write public as far as I know there is nothing like public private access types in PHP? – Josh Dec 23 '09 at 19:21
2  
Yes, Nishant. There are public, private, protected in OOP in PHP. – Sampson Dec 23 '09 at 19:22
    
Visiblity: php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.visibility.php – Sampson Dec 23 '09 at 19:23
1  
Better yet- Nishant read all of this: php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.php – Mike B Dec 23 '09 at 21:26

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