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Combining Unit of Work and Repository Pattern is something used fairly widely nowadays. As Martin Fowler says a purpose of using UoW is to form a Business Transaction while being ignorant of how repositories actually work (being persistent ignorant). I've reviewed many implementations; and ignoring specific details (concrete/abstract class, interface,...) they are more or less similar to what follows:

public class RepositoryBase<T>
{
    private UoW _uow;
    public RepositoryBase(UoW uow) // injecting UoW instance via constructor
    {
       _uow = uow;
    }
    public void Add(T entity)
    {
       // Add logic here
    }
    // +other CRUD methods
}

public class UoW
{
    // Holding one repository per domain entity

    public RepositoryBase<Order> OrderRep { get; set; }
    public RepositoryBase<Customer> CustomerRep { get; set; }
    // +other repositories

    public void Commit()
    {
       // Psedudo code: 
       For all the contained repositories do:
           store repository changes.
    }
}

Now my problem:

UoW exposes public method Commit to store the changes. Also, because each repository has a shared instance of UoW, each Repository can access method Commit on UoW. Calling it by one repository makes all other repositories store their changes too; hence the result the whole concept of transaction collapses:

class Repository<T> : RepositoryBase<T>
{
    private UoW _uow;
    public void SomeMethod()
    {
        // some processing or data manipulations here
        _uow.Commit(); // makes other repositories also save their changes
    }
}

I think this must be not allowed. Considering the purpose of the UoW (business transaction), the method Commit should be exposed only to the one who started a Business Transaction for example Business Layer. What surprised me is that I couldn't find any article addressing this issue. In all of them Commit can be called by any repo being injected.

PS: I know I can tell my developers not to call Commit in a Repository but trusting Architecture is much much more reliable than trusting developers!

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26  
The question title is like a chapter of LOTR. –  Fendy Oct 24 '13 at 0:18
1  
If you're comfortable with the concept of eventual consistency, you can use domain events to implement the 'transaction'. It's more domain driven, elegant and clean but you need to involve a service bus and make your handlers idempotent –  MikeSW Oct 24 '13 at 7:54
1  
@Fendy: LOTR is obsolete in favor of "Game of Thrones" –  Learner Jun 19 at 14:13

5 Answers 5

I do agree with your concerns. I prefer to have an ambient unit of work, where the outermost function opening a unit of work is the one that decides whether to commit or abort. Functions called can open a unit of work scope which automatically enlists in the ambient UoW if there is one, or creates a new one if there is none.

The implementation of the UnitOfWorkScope that I used is heavily inspired by how TransactionScope works. Using an ambient/scoped approach also removes the need for dependency injection.

A method that performs a query looks like this:

public static Entities.Car GetCar(int id)
{
    using (var uow = new UnitOfWorkScope<CarsContext>(UnitOfWorkScopePurpose.Reading))
    {
        return uow.DbContext.Cars.Single(c => c.CarId == id);
    }
}

A method that writes looks like this:

using (var uow = new UnitOfWorkScope<CarsContext>(UnitOfWorkScopePurpose.Writing))
{
    Car c = SharedQueries.GetCar(carId);
    c.Color = "White";
    uow.SaveChanges();
}

Note that the uow.SaveChanges() call will only do an actual save to the database if this is the root (otermost) scope. Otherwise it is interpreted as an "okay vote" that the root scope will be allowed to save the changes.

The entire implementation of the UnitOfWorkScope is available at: http://coding.abel.nu/2012/10/make-the-dbcontext-ambient-with-unitofworkscope/

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3  
I read it and I really relieved to see someone has similar concern. But I wonder why not using TransactionScope? It is more convenient and makes the architecture more flexible to be expanded and changed later. Moreover, you blocked the call to SaveChanges in run-time for a ReadOnly UoW. That's okay but I have bad feeling about it. Honestly, I think what repositories consume as a UoW shouldn't expose SaveChanges to them. –  Alireza Oct 28 '13 at 19:13
    
A key feature of the UoW is to ensure that all entities loaded within a business transaction are loaded by the same UoW/DBContext. TransactionScope is not enough for that. Regarding SaveChanges: Another design could be two classes; one for reading and one for writing, that both used the same ambient DBContext. –  Anders Abel Oct 29 '13 at 8:17
    
What happens if a developer creates a nested UnitOfWorkScope with inner and outer both having UnitOfWorkScopePurpose.Writing? If the outer UnitOfWork is aborted does the inner still get saved? –  Colin Nov 1 '13 at 13:48
    
It is only the outermost UnitOfWorkScope that will actually save changes and it will only be allowed if all child scopes have "voted yes" by calling SaveChanges(). If any child scope failed to call SaveChanges(), e.g. because of an exception, nothing will be saved. –  Anders Abel Nov 1 '13 at 14:42

Don't pass in the UnitOfWork, pass in an interface that has the methods you need. You can still implement that interface in the original concrete UnitOfWork implementation if you want:

public interface IDbContext
{
   void Add<T>(T entity);
}

public interface IUnitOfWork
{
   void Commit();
}

public class UnitOfWork : IDbContext, IUnitOfWork
{
   public void Add<T>(T entity);
   public void Commit();
}

public class RepositoryBase<T>
{
    private IDbContext _c;

    public RepositoryBase(IDbContext c) 
    {
       _c = c;
    }

    public void Add(T entity)
    {
       _c.Add(entity)
    }
}

EDIT

After posting this I had a rethink. Exposing the Add method in the UnitOfWork implementation means it is a combination of the two patterns.

I use Entity Framework in my own code and the DbContext used there is described as "a combination of the Unit-Of-Work and Repository pattern".

I think it is better to split the two, and that means I need two wrappers around DbContext one for the Unit Of Work bit and one for the Repository bit. And I do the repository wrapping in RepositoryBase.

The key difference is that I do not pass the UnitOfWork to the Repositories, I pass the DbContext. That does mean that the BaseRepository has access to a SaveChanges on the DbContext. And since the intention is that custom repositories should inherit BaseRepository, they get access to a DbContext too. It is therefore possible that a developer could add code in a custom repository that uses that DbContext. So I guess my "wrapper" is a bit leaky...

So is it worth creating another wrapper for the DbContext that can be passed to the repository constructors to close that off? Not sure that it is...

Examples of passing the DbContext:

Implementing the Repository and Unit of Work

Repository and Unit of Work in Entity Framework

John Papa's original source code

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May be the only solution is this. What is your experience? What do you do in your projects? Have you ever noticed this problem or do you event consider this an issue. –  Alireza Oct 29 '13 at 13:46
    
I've tended to follow the usual pattern but I do think you have a valid point. –  Colin Oct 29 '13 at 14:05
    
The bad thing about passing DBContext or ObjectContext is that you cannot access other Repositories within any repository. Suppose one Repository has it's special and own way of storing the related entity. Simply adding that entity to the DBContext means falsely bypassing the related Repository and logic. –  Alireza Nov 1 '13 at 13:54
    
@Alireza I prefer that my repositories cannot access one another. They do nothing more than CRUD and any special logic goes into my service classes –  Colin Nov 1 '13 at 13:58
    
Hmmm, One thing I strive to achieve is to keep any IQueriable object within DAL (or DAL implementation) and not exposing it to Service layer. This way I can take advantage of the innate power of IQueriable (If DAL implementation is based on EF) and meanwhile make the user layer(s) completely ignorant of how DAL works and what methods it supports and what it doesn't support. Not only because of this, but also in general I think Repositories can talk to each other –  Alireza Nov 1 '13 at 14:05

Make your repositories members of your UoW. Don't let your repositories 'see' your UoW. Let UoW handle the transaction.

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My answer is poor. Please ignore. So, how to handle nested business transactions? I've been pondering this for a while. This is a thought, not an answer, as it's not tested: Should the controller perform the commit, and then don't make the commit available to the repositories/service objects? –  Chalky Nov 4 at 22:28

In .NET, data access components typically automatically enlist to ambient transactions. Hence, saving changes intra-transactionally becomes separated from comitting the transaction to persist the changes.

Put differently - if you create a transaction scope you can let the developers save as much as they want. Not until the transaction is committed the observable state of the database(s) will be updated (well, what is observable depends on the transaction isolation level).

This shows how to create a transaction scope in c#:

using (TransactionScope scope = new TransactionScope())
{
    // Your logic here. Save inside the transaction as much as you want.

    scope.Complete(); // <-- This will complete the transaction and make the changes permanent.
}
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It may be a workaround. The TransactionScope should wrap the whole UoW class(not just the Commit method). However, instead of looking for a workaround I'm looking for why folks didn't notice this issue or may be I am wrong. Thank you very much anyway –  Alireza Oct 23 '13 at 18:04
1  
Encapsulating data manipulations in a transaction like this is common practice and this is how I do it myself. I have never regarded this as a 'workaround' but rather as one simple (and important) part of the code. To me, calling this a workaround is similar to saying 'the data type int is just a workaround used because strings don't work well with multiplication'. –  lightbricko Oct 23 '13 at 18:13
    
Where do you create the TransactionScope? In Commit method? –  Alireza Oct 23 '13 at 18:16
    
No, I don't create the transaction scope in the commit method. It depends on the application architecture. Currently I develop an application that is using the Command Query Responsibility Segregation (CQRS) pattern. In this application I create a transaction scope already when a command is received on the server. –  lightbricko Oct 23 '13 at 18:23
    
I agree that your way works when back-end storage is a transaction-supporting data source such as MSSqlServer. But what if one repository works on a source like ordinary file which does not support transaction? Moreover, what if on UoW.Commit an specific checking should be done that if RepoA has dirty data and RepoB has too, then RepoC should store a report somewhere? Clearly, if RepoA has saved itself sooner, on a later call to Commit it will be assumed that RepoA has nothing changed and no report will be generated. –  Alireza Oct 23 '13 at 18:36

Yes, this question is a concern to me, and here's how I handle it.

First of all, in my understanding Domain Model should not know about Unit of Work. Domain Model consists of interfaces (or abstract classes) that don't imply the existence of the transactional storage. In fact, it does not know about the existence of any storage at all. Hence the term Domain Model.

Unit of Work is present in the Domain Model Implementation layer. I guess this is my term, and by that I mean a layer that implements Domain Model interfaces by incorporating Data Access Layer. Usually, I use ORM as DAL and therefore it comes with built-in UoW in it (Entity Framework SaveChanges or SubmitChanges method to commit the pending changes). However, that one belongs to DAL and does not need any inventor's magic.

On the other hand, you are referring to the UoW that you need to have in Domain Model Implementation layer because you need to abstract away the part of "committing changes to DAL". For that, I would go with Anders Abel's solution (recursive scropes), because that addresses two things you need to solve in one shot:

  • You need to support saving of aggregates as one transaction, if the aggregate is an initiator of the scope.
  • You need to support saving of aggregates as part of the parent transaction, if the aggregate is not the initiator of the scope, but is part of it.
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