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In Java, you can associate multiple Condition objects to a single ReentrantLock. What would the C# equivalent be?

Real-world example: The example implementation in the Java Condition documentation uses two Condition objects, notFull and notEmpty, tied to the same lock. How could that example be translated to C#?

Background: I often find Java code using two Condition objects to signal various states, associated to the same Lock; in C#, it seems that you can either

  • call Monitor.Enter on an object, and then Monitor.WaitOne/Monitor.Pulse, but that's just one condition.
  • use multiple Auto/ManualResetEvent objects, but these cannot atomically reacquire a given lock after waiting.

Note: I can think of one way: using Monitor.WaitOne/Monitor.PulseAll on a single object, and checking for the condition after waking up; that's what you do in Java as well to protect against spurious wake-ups. It doesn't really do, though, because it forces you to call PulseAll instead of Pulse, since Pulse might wake up a thread waiting on another condition. Unfortunately, using PulseAll instead of Pulse has performance implications (threads competing for the same lock).

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3 Answers 3

I think if you are doing new development and can do .NET 4 or above, you'll be better served by the new concurrent collection classes, like ConcurrentQueue.

But if you can't make that move, and to strictly answer your question, in .NET this is somewhat simplified imho, to implement a prod/cons pattern you would just do wait and then pulse like below (note that I typed this on notepad)

// max is 1000 items in queue
private int _count = 1000;

private Queue<string> _myQueue = new Queue<string>();

private static object _door = new object();

public void AddItem(string someItem)
{
    lock (_door)
    {
        while (_myQueue.Count == _count)
        {
            // reached max item, let's wait 'till there is room
            Monitor.Wait(_door);
        }

        _myQueue.Enqueue(someItem);
        // signal so if there are therads waiting for items to be inserted are waken up
        // one at a time, so they don't try to dequeue items that are not there
        Monitor.Pulse(_door);
    }
}

public string RemoveItem()
{
    string item = null;

    lock (_door)
    {
        while (_myQueue.Count == 0)
        {
            // no items in queue, wait 'till there are items
            Monitor.Wait(_door);
        }

        item = _myQueue.Dequeue();
        // signal we've taken something out
        // so if there are threads waiting, will be waken up one at a time so we don't overfill our queue
        Monitor.Pulse(_door);
    }

    return item;
}

Update: To clear up any confusion, note that Monitor.Wait releases a lock, therefore you won't get a deadlock

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Yup, that's right in the case of queues, but it doesn't answer the question fully; it only works because your conditions (== 0, == _count) are mutually exclusive, so the two waits won't happen at the same time. –  Clément Oct 23 '13 at 18:07
    
The code above is not correct. You need to replace Pulse with PulseAll. Consider the following scenario: The queue is full and has 2 producers and 1 consumer. Consumer consumes one item then wakes procuder1, producer1 produces one item then wakes producer2. The queue is full again and we have a dead lock. –  Reda Oct 23 '13 at 18:19
    
@user2266486 I disagree, if the queue is full, two producers are waiting, on pulse will wake one thread, and one item gets inserted and the queue is full again, if you do PulseAll then your queue will have more than your max number of items, and if your queue is not full to start with, you won't have two producers waiting. Also the prod won't wait if the queue is not full, and the cons won't wait if the queue is not empty –  Jason Oct 23 '13 at 18:25
    
@Clément maybe I misunderstood your question, but the sample (link) you provided is doing the same thing in Java's way, this is doing it in .NET's way. Basically there is no need for the NewCondition objects, in .NET you use Monitor to wait and signal on a shared/common object –  Jason Oct 23 '13 at 18:28
1  
@Jason If the queue is full and you wake only ONE thread, you are not guaranteed that thread is a consumer. It might be a producer and you get stuck. –  Reda Oct 23 '13 at 18:38

@Jason If the queue is full and you wake only ONE thread, you are not guaranteed that thread is a consumer. It might be a producer and you get stuck.

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Can't figure out how to delete this –  Reda Oct 23 '13 at 18:44

I haven't come across much C# code that would want to share state within a lock. Without rolling your own you could use a SemaphoreSlim (but I recommend ConcurrentQueue(T) or BlockingCollection(T)).

public class BoundedBuffer<T>
{
    private readonly SemaphoreSlim _locker = new SemaphoreSlim(1,1);
    private readonly int _maxCount = 1000;
    private readonly Queue<T> _items;

    public int Count { get { return _items.Count; } }

    public BoundedBuffer()
    {
        _items = new Queue<T>(_maxCount);
    }

    public BoundedBuffer(int maxCount)
    {
        _maxCount = maxCount;
        _items = new Queue<T>(_maxCount);
    }

    public void Put(T item, CancellationToken token)
    {
        _locker.Wait(token);

        try
        {
            while(_maxCount == _items.Count)
            {
                _locker.Release();
                Thread.SpinWait(1000);
                _locker.Wait(token);
            }

            _items.Enqueue(item);
        }
        catch(OperationCanceledException)
        {
            try
            {
                _locker.Release();
            }
            catch(SemaphoreFullException) { }

            throw;
        }
        finally
        {
            if(!token.IsCancellationRequested)
            {
                _locker.Release();
            }
        }
    }

    public T Take(CancellationToken token)
    {
        _locker.Wait(token);

        try
        {
            while(0 == _items.Count)
            {
                _locker.Release();
                Thread.SpinWait(1000);
                _locker.Wait(token);
            }

            return _items.Dequeue();
        }
        catch(OperationCanceledException)
        {
            try
            {
                _locker.Release();
            }
            catch(SemaphoreFullException) { }

            throw;
        }
        finally
        {
            if(!token.IsCancellationRequested)
            {
                _locker.Release();
            }
        }
    }
}
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Isn't that basically the same as using a single object to Wait on? The code doesn't make it clear that you have two distinct condition, nor do the signalling affect only certain waiting threads; plus you're waiting actively by polling through SpinWait, doesn't that have performance implications? –  Clément Oct 23 '13 at 21:53
    
There is no guarantee which thread (producer or consumer) gets the lock. The Thread.SpinWait reduces the lock contention, so threads that aren't making progress don't consume the lock as much. –  Romoku Oct 24 '13 at 10:48
    
I checked out the source for the ReentrantLock and it breaks down to a double lock with priority. –  Romoku Oct 24 '13 at 11:49

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