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Help me make this method more solid:

 /**
  * Check if the method is declared in the interface.
  * Assumes the method was obtained from a concrete class that 
  * implements the interface, and return true if the method overrides
  * a method from the interface.
  */
 public static boolean isDeclaredInInterface(Method method, Class<?> interfaceClass) {
     for (Method methodInInterface : interfaceClass.getMethods())
     {
         if (methodInInterface.getName().equals(method.getName()))
             return true;
     }
     return false;
 }
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9  
You can have two methods with the same name but with different parameters. –  JRL Dec 23 '09 at 19:53
2  
Why? What would that information buy for you? –  duffymo Dec 23 '09 at 20:00
    
Why do people always insist to know "the why" here ? :) I want to expose these methods only from a Hessian servlet via HTTP-GET, and I want to filter non-relevant methods - filtering by the interface is exactly what I need. –  ripper234 Dec 23 '09 at 20:52
4  
@ripper234, because they might be able to suggest easier solutions to the original problem. –  matt b Dec 23 '09 at 21:50
1  
The reason we wonder why is because on the surface it sounds a little backwards and your explanation leaves out details needed to make that not so. For example, if you know the interface and you know your object implements that interface then why not only expose methods from the interface instead of from the concrete class? –  PSpeed Dec 24 '09 at 0:38
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5 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

How about this:

try {
    interfaceClass.getMethod(method.getName(), method.getParameterTypes());
    return true;
} catch (NoSuchMethodException e) {
    return false;
}
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1  
You don't want to use exceptions as part of your normal control logic. –  Anon. Dec 23 '09 at 20:01
4  
@Anon, as a rule no, but if that is what the API gives you, then there you are. How do you determine if a String can be parsed into an Integer? –  Yishai Dec 23 '09 at 20:02
    
Haven't used Java in a while - C# provides TryParse for that purpose. –  Anon. Dec 23 '09 at 20:11
    
Need to catch SecurityException as well, although, in that case (access to package or method denied), I don't know whether you'd want to return true or false. If access to package is denied, the method may or may not exist. If access to method is denied, I'm pretty sure the method exists but you can't access it. –  shoover Dec 23 '09 at 20:15
    
Yeah, I argued for a while on java.net for an Integer.isInt(String) method, but apparently I was a minority. –  Yishai Dec 23 '09 at 20:17
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This is a good start:

Replace:

for (Method methodInInterface : interfaceClass.getMethods())
 {
     if (methodInInterface.getName().equals(method.getName()))
         return true;
 }

with:

for (Method methodInInterface : interfaceClass.getMethods()) {
     if (methodInInterface.getName().equals(method.getName())) {
         return true;
     }
 }

:)

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See Method#getDeclaringClass(), then just compare Class objects with the expected interface(s).

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I don't think you understood the question. I'd suggest to reread the question and all answers then. –  BalusC Jan 3 '10 at 23:33
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To make your method more robust, you probably also want to check if Class#isInterface() returns true for the given class and throw IllegalArgumentException otherwise.

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If you want to avoid catching NoSuchMethodException from Yashai's answer:

for (Method ifaceMethod : iface.getMethods()) {
    if (ifaceMethod.getName().equals(candidate.getName()) &&
            Arrays.equals(ifaceMethod.getParameterTypes(), candidate.getParameterTypes())) {
        return true;
    }
}
return false;
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