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I need to write a lisp function that adds x to the nth item of a list. For example, (add 5 2 '(3 1 4 6 7)) returns (3 6 4 6 7).

choosing nthitem is

(defun nthitem (n list)
  (cond ((equal n 1) (car list))
        (t (nthitem (-n 1) (cdr list)))))

and adding x to a list is:

(defun addto (x list)
  (cond ((null list) nil)
        (t (cons (+ x (car list)) 
                 (addto x (cdr list))))))

But i cannot combine these two together.

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In (add 5 2 '(3 1 4 6 7)), you should note that the element at index 2 is 4, not 1, so the result should be (3 1 9 6 7). –  Joshua Taylor Oct 23 '13 at 19:50
3  
Can you list the restrictions that inhibit you from (defun add (x n list) (incf (nth n list) x))? –  Svante Oct 23 '13 at 20:28

4 Answers 4

All you need is nth and setf:

emacs -Q, then evaluate the following:

(defun add-to-nth (x n ys)
  (when ys (setf (nth n ys) (+ x (nth n ys)))))

(setq foobar  '(1 2 3 4 5))
(add-to-nth 42 1 foobar)

C-h v foobar  ; =>  (1 44 3 4 5)
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Why "when ys"? - ys is obligatory here. –  Andreas Röhler Oct 29 '13 at 19:25
    
(nth N nil) returns nil. You cannot set nil; it is a constant. –  Drew Oct 29 '13 at 20:16

Use setnth

(setq a (list 3 1 4 6 7))

(defun add-number-to-nth-element (arg liste element)
  "Add ARG, a number, to nth ELEMENT of LISTE. "
  (setnth element liste (+ arg (nth element liste)))
  liste)

(add-number-to-nth-element 5 a 1) 

;; ==> (3 6 4 6 7)
;; ==> (3 11 4 6 7)
;; ==> (3 16 4 6 7)
;; ==> (3 21 4 6 7)
;; ==> (3 26 4 6 7)

;; counting elements starts with 0

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We don't get to use nreconc enough. Here's a solution based on do and reconc. The idea is to walk down the list accumulating the elements from the list in reverse order until you get to the position of the element that you need to replace. Then you stick the bits together. That is, you reverse the list you've been accumulating, and attach it to a list built from the new element and the tail after that.

(defun add (number index list)
  (do ((head '() (list* (first tail) head))
       (tail list (rest tail))
       (index index (1- index)))
      ((zerop index)
       (nreconc head (list* (+ number (first tail))
                            (rest tail))))))
CL-USER> (add 5 2 '(3 1 4 6 7))
(3 1 9 6 7)

It's worth seeing how these values change over time. Let's consider an example with more numbers, and look at the value of head, tail, and index in each iteration:

CL-USER> (add 90 5 '(0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9))
(0 1 2 3 4 95 6 7 8 9)

head: ()
tail: (0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9)
index: 5

head: (0)
tail: (1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9)
index: 4

head: (1 0)
tail: (2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9)
index: 3

head: (2 1 0)
tail: (3 4 5 6 7 8 9)
index: 2

head: (3 2 1 0)
tail: (4 5 6 7 8 9)
index: 1

head: (4 3 2 1 0)
tail: (5 6 7 8 9)
index: 0

Once we get to 0, we can get the rest of the final result by adding number to (car tail) and putting it together with (cdr tail), i.e.,

(list* (+ (car tail) number) (cdr tail)

which produces

(95 6 7 8 9)

and then use nreconc to take (4 3 2 1 0) and (95 6 7 8 9) and get (0 1 2 3 4 95 6 7 8 9), i.e.,

(nreconc (list 4 3 2 1 0) '(95 6 7 8 9))
;=> (0 1 2 3 4 95 6 7 8 9)

Now, if for some reason you can't use do, e.g., this is a homework assignment, that trace should still give you enough information to write a direct recursive version of this with an accumulator. No matter what, though, you'll still need to be able to reverse (or nreverse) a list, and to append (or nconc) some lists together (or, combined, revappend or nreconc).

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You have major formatting issues and you lack space between operators some places. Be sure to use an editor that does parenthesis matching like Emacs or Kate.

Just to show you how you combine those two without changing it from addto functionality

(defun addto (x n list)
  (cond ((null list) nil)
        (t (cons (+ x (car list)) 
                 (addto x (- n 1) (cdr list))))))

So your code should have two case in addition to the base case. One where (= n 1) since you start counting at 1 instead of 0 which is your default case today and one that doesn't add the car, just copy while doing the same recursion in the cdr. Good luck

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