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I'm a unit-testing noob and struggling to find a good way to test my repositories. I have created a CustomConfigurationManager that loads my Custom.Config values. But cannot figure out how to test them.

My questions are

  1. How do I test the code inside GetUserById()
  2. How do I test my CustomConfigurationManager()

This is my repository I'm trying to test:

public class UserRepository : IUserRepository
{
    public User GetUserById(string id)
    {
        return CustomConfigurationManager.CustomConfig.Users.FirstOrDefault(u => u.UserId == id);
    }
}


public class CustomConfigurationManager
{
    public static Configs CustomConfig
    {
        get
        {
            return CustomConfigLoader.LoadConfig<Configs>();
        }
    }
}

internal sealed class ConfigLoader
{
    public static T LoadConfig<T>() where T : class
    {
        ...

        return LoadFromXML<T>();
    }
}

And the XML

 <users>
    <user id="Foo" name="Bar" ... />
    ...
</users>

The code I pasted is modified and is not the real code. It's only an example.

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Have you considered relying on Integration Testing to prove that your repositories work? You can create a mock database to test your repository methods, but you still need to test them with a real database. –  Robert Harvey Oct 23 '13 at 19:51
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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'm sure many will point out that in a precise sense, if you're reading a file, it isn't a unit test. Really, you should be testing something like that in a more loose manner, or find a way to fake it.

A tip that should help you considerably:

public class UserRepository : IUserRepository
{
    public Configs CustomConfig {get;set;}
    public User GetUserById(string id)
    {
        return CustomConfig.Users.FirstOrDefault(u => u.UserId == id);
    }
}

The idea is that by injecting it (perhaps only in the constructor) you can test it without reading from a file. This is called DI (Dependency Injection) and is generally best done with an interface.

Your CustomConfigurationManager is difficult to test because it calls another static method in a property; you can probably just not use it. It's extra complexity which hides details but hides dependencies as well, which you never want to do.

You can't really test the ConfigLoader without InternalsVisibleTo, but I consider that bad practice as well. Does this class need to be sealed?

Try to focus your design around making methods work without assuming a specific implementation where possible. If you find yourself passing in too many things, you probably need a new class. If you find yourself doing too many things at once, you probably need more methods.

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