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I am developing an android app and as I read all around and learned for myself, I cant have a lot of images on the screen at the same time or I will get an exception.

The question is how many images or how many KB in images or how many layouts/images can I have at the same time in the screen.

I know this is not the only thing that has influence on memory, but I am looking for a number so I can plan around it.

Thanks

Daniel


Edit:

I just found this on the android dev site (http://developer.android.com/resources/articles/future-proofing.html)

Technique to Avoid, #3: Going Overboard with Layouts

Due to changes in the View rendering infrastructure, unreasonably deep (more than 10 or so) or broad (more than 30 total) View hierarchies in layouts are now likely to cause crashes. This was always a risk for excessively complex layouts, but you can think of Android 1.5 as being better than 1.1 at exposing this problem. Most developers won't need to worry about this, but if your app has very complicated layouts, you'll need to put it on a diet. You can simplify your layouts using the more advanced layout classes like FrameLayout and TableLayout.

I guess this can be my problem.

When it says 'broad' , is it saying on the last level ?

Thanks

Daniel

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1  
Related: stackoverflow.com/questions/1949066/… –  Mark Byers Dec 23 '09 at 20:41
    
If you have to ask, you can't afford it. –  Anon. Dec 23 '09 at 20:42

5 Answers 5

One of the most common errors that I found developing Android Apps is the

java.lang.OutOfMemoryError: Bitmap Size Exceeds VM Budget error.

I found this error frequently on activities using lots of bitmaps after changing orientation: the Activity is destroyed, created again and the layouts are “inflated” from the XML consuming the VM memory available for bitmaps.

Bitmaps on the previous activity layout are not properly deallocated by the garbage collector because they have crossed references to their activity. After many experiments I found a quite good solution for this problem.

First, set the id attribute on the parent view of your XML layout:

    <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
    <RelativeLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
     android:layout_width="fill_parent"
     android:layout_height="fill_parent"
     android:id="@+id/RootView"
     >
     ...

Then, on the onDestroy() method of your Activity, call the unbindDrawables() method passing a refence to the parent View and then do a System.gc()

    @Override
    protected void onDestroy() {
    super.onDestroy();

    unbindDrawables(findViewById(R.id.RootView));
    System.gc();
    }

    private void unbindDrawables(View view) {
        if (view.getBackground() != null) {
        view.getBackground().setCallback(null);
        }
        if (view instanceof ViewGroup) {
            for (int i = 0; i < ((ViewGroup) view).getChildCount(); i++) {
            unbindDrawables(((ViewGroup) view).getChildAt(i));
            }
        ((ViewGroup) view).removeAllViews();
        }
    }

This unbindDrawables() method explores the view tree recursively and:

  • Removes callbacks on all the background drawables
  • Removes childs on every viewgroup
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your logic worked for me to solve out the out of memory exception....thanks alot for sharing such a great logic –  Sam-In-TechValens Oct 9 '12 at 12:12
up vote 2 down vote accepted

This answer has 2 parts

1) its not how much images the screen has, but being carefull on cleaning everything up when finishing the activity

2) (Future-Proofing Your App)

Technique to Avoid, #3: Going Overboard with Layouts

Due to changes in the View rendering infrastructure, unreasonably deep (more than 10 or so) or broad (more than 30 total) View hierarchies in layouts are now likely to cause crashes. This was always a risk for excessively complex layouts, but you can think of Android 1.5 as being better than 1.1 at exposing this problem. Most developers won't need to worry about this, but if your app has very complicated layouts, you'll need to put it on a diet. You can simplify your layouts using the more advanced layout classes like FrameLayout and TableLayout.

Daniel

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The amount of memory varies from device to device and the amount you have to play with depends on what else the system is doing at the time. Your best bet is to not even come close to running the system out of memory if you can help it. What are you doing that you need that many images on the screen?

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yes i have many images on the screeen and its crashing again and again how to resolve it. –  Abhijit Chakra Mar 6 '13 at 6:53

This thing is depends on the HEAP size of phone . so if your application acquire more heap then phone provided then it may be create a problem .

the new generation android device contain .here is the list of some

HTC Wildfire (2.2.1) = 16MB.
HTC Wildfire S (2.3.5) = 20MB.
HTC Salsa (2.3.3) = 20MB.
HTC Desire (2.3.3) = 32MB.
HTC Desire S (2.3.5) = 32MB.
Samsung Galaxy S GT-I9000 (2.2) = 48MB.
Samsung Galaxy R GT-I9103 (2.3.5) = 64MB.
Samsung Galaxy Y GT-S5360 (2.3.5) = 64MB

so there is not certan solution for it , but you can try to optimize the the bitmap size . for example recycle the bitmap after use it . or make another using bitmapFectory deoeed from sampleSize .

IF you are using a emulator then you can create a device which contain more heap size to Add new extra hardware configure in your avd manager as VM heap size = 32 or up .

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1  
that is only for a simulator, but not for real devices, so its not a solution –  Daniel Benedykt Nov 25 '10 at 14:11
    
@DanielBenedykt yah you are right ,,look i have edited it –  dhams May 18 '12 at 5:21

I've run into the same problem at work and I didn't find a solution for it.

The app crashes after calling repeatedly createImage(), thru an OutOfMemoryException. My guess is that it's not caused by an Activity or a Context leak as my app always remains active while experiencing this problem.

I've tried to debug the heap to see if there was anything supicious, but no access is possible to the bitmap memory space (I've tried on a G1 1.6, maybe 1.5). So no idea on what's going on there (any possible solutions to this?).

I'm not quite sure what would be the cause, possible memory leak or memory fragmentation issue?

Help is appreciated!

Thanks.

Guillaume

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