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I am writing a recursive backtracking algorithm for a suduko solver. It seems it is terrible at suduko.

Code:

def recursiveBacktrack(board):
  if(checkEntireBoard(board)):
    return board
  else:
    for node in board:
      if(node.val == "."):
        for val in (1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9):
           if(checkNodeConstraintsOk(board, node, val)):
             node.val = val
             posNewBoard = recursiveBacktrack(board)
             if(posNewBoard != None):
               return posNewBoard
             else:
              node.val = "."
         return None

boards are made up of node objects. Each node object has a (x,y) for the board, a value that is either a number or a period for no assignment, and a square value (what suduko square it is in).

I know for a fact that both my methods checkEntireBoard and checkNodeConstraintsOk work. checkEntireBoard checks to see if the board is solved properly and checkNodeConstraintsOk checks to see if I were to set the given node to the given value on the given board if the constraints of the suduko game hold true.

For some reason I think my algorithm above is not working properly (see output below), I have followed the pseudocode for recursive backtracking exactly and can find no error. So I would have to figure the error lies with my low knowledge of python.

------------------------------
7  5  9  | .  4  .  | .  .  .  
6  8  .  | 5  .  .  | .  4  .  
.  3  .  | 2  .  9  | 5  .  .  
------------------------------
5  6  .  | 1  .  .  | 9  .  .  
.  .  3  | .  .  .  | 1  .  .  
.  .  1  | .  .  6  | .  3  7  
------------------------------
.  .  5  | 3  .  7  | .  9  .  
.  7  .  | .  .  8  | .  5  3  
.  .  .  | .  6  .  | 7  2  1  
------------------------------

Found Solution 
------------------------------
7  5  9  | 1  4  2  | 3  4  5  
6  8  1  | 5  3  4  | 2  4  6  
2  3  3  | 2  5  9  | 5  1  7  
------------------------------
5  6  2  | 1  1  3  | 9  5  4  
1  3  3  | 2  4  5  | 1  6  8  
4  5  1  | 6  7  6  | 1  3  7  
------------------------------
3  1  5  | 3  2  7  | 4  9  9  
5  7  4  | 3  6  8  | 7  5  3  
6  2  7  | 4  6  1  | 7  2  1  
------------------------------

If the error does not show up in my backtracking algorithm I will end up opening a code review on codereview.stack. But from what I have seen the problem lies above.

EDIT

def checkEntireBoard(board):
  for node in board:
    if(node.val == "."):
      return False
    if(not checkNodeConstraintsOk(board, node, node.val)):
      return False
  return True

def checkNodeConstraintsOk(board, inNode, posVal):
  val = posVal
  for node in board:
    if(node != inNode and node.val == val):
      if(node.x == inNode.x or node.y == inNode.y or node.sqr == inNode.sqr):
        return False
  return True

EDIT2

Solved thanks Peter

Found Solution 
------------------------------
7  5  9  | 6  4  3  | 8  1  2  
6  8  2  | 5  7  1  | 3  4  9  
1  3  4  | 2  8  9  | 5  7  6  
------------------------------
5  6  7  | 1  3  2  | 9  8  4  
8  2  3  | 7  9  4  | 1  6  5  
9  4  1  | 8  5  6  | 2  3  7  
------------------------------
4  1  5  | 3  2  7  | 6  9  8  
2  7  6  | 9  1  8  | 4  5  3  
3  9  8  | 4  6  5  | 7  2  1  
------------------------------
share|improve this question
    
Can you give us your checkEntireBoard and checkNodeConstraintsOk functions so people can debug your code? Because it sure looks like checkNodeConstraintsOk is returning True in cases where it shouldn;t. –  abarnert Oct 23 '13 at 22:28
    
For checking the node constraints I went like this. We only care about nodes with the same value as us, and we don't care about ourselves because it will obviously have the same value. So if we find a node that has the same value, and shares a x, y, or square value with us then we cannot make the assignment of posVal to inNode –  user1311286 Oct 23 '13 at 22:36
    
By the way, "terrible at Sudoku" is an ambiguous term. Sure, it gets the wrong answers, but it probably gets them a lot faster than a correct algorithm, and it doesn't know it's gotten them wrong, and most humans in that situation would be happy. :) –  abarnert Oct 23 '13 at 22:47
    
Anyway, this still isn't enough to run and debug your code, and it still seems quite possible that the error is in the code you haven't shown us. We really need an SSCCE to help. –  abarnert Oct 23 '13 at 22:49
    
If my theory isn't the problem, it would still be a good idea to show how board and its known nodes get created. –  Peter DeGlopper Oct 23 '13 at 22:50

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Check the type of your initial node values. If they're getting initialized with, say, val = "1" instead of val = 1 then your checkNodeConstraintsOk function won't spot the conflict because the values won't be equal. I see that none of the incorrect values in your example conflict with one added by your recursive backtracker, just the starting values, so I suspect this is the problem.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeahp right on the money! /// Good thought! "I see that none of the incorrect values in your example conflict with one added by your recursive backtracker, just the starting values, so I suspect this is the problem" –  user1311286 Oct 23 '13 at 22:52
    
@BumSkeeter: This is exactly the reason I wanted an SSCCE in the first place. The problem wasn't in your original code, so I asked for the rest of the code. You gave a little more, and the problem still wasn't there, so I asked for more. You argued that you didn't want to give it. If you've given us the code with the problem in the first place, you would have gotten an instant solution, instead of a lucky guess that turned out to be right 25 minutes later, and without wasting the time of multiple people who want to help you. –  abarnert Oct 23 '13 at 23:08
    
Ok, ok, ok, I'm sorry. I'll post code verbatim from now on. I did not argue that I did not want to give more code, you made a single comment and I uploaded it as an edit almost instantly. Your first comment was posted minutes after the question was posted, and I put the extra code there within seconds, the entire code needed to see the issue was there within 5 minutes of the OP. I also don't see the answer as a lucky guess. Peter had a very intuitive thought to check whether the assignments being made by me were consistent with each other. If thats luck, Einstein might just be a gambler. –  user1311286 Oct 23 '13 at 23:22

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