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My GPU seems to allow 562% use of global memory and 133% use of local memory for a simple PyOpenCL matrix addition kernel. Here is what my script prints:

GPU: GeForce GTX 670

Global Memory - Total: 2 GB
Global Memory - One Buffer: 3.750000 GB
Number of Global Buffers: 3
Global Memory - All Buffers: 11.250000 GB
Global Memory - Usage: 562.585844 %

Local Memory - Total:  48 KB
Local Memory - One Array: 32.000000 KB
Number of Local Arrays: 2
Local Memory - All Arrays: 64.000000 KB
Local Memory - Usage: 133.333333 %

If I increase global memory use much above this point, I get the error: mem object allocation failure

If I increase local memory use above this point, I get the error: invalid work group size

Why doesn't my script fail immediately when memory use of local or global exceeds 100%?

share|improve this question
    
removing CUDA tag. – Robert Crovella Oct 23 '13 at 23:10
1  
What is the program you are using to gather that data? – DarkZeros Oct 24 '13 at 9:04
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Global size is multiplied by 32, thats the error.

When clearly a float32 has 4bytes, this makes a and b arrays 4 bytes each. Not 32.

So the proper results for you would be:

Global Memory - Total: 2 GB
Global Memory - One Buffer: 0.4687500 GB
Number of Global Buffers: 3
Global Memory - All Buffers: 1.40625 GB
Global Memory - Usage: 70.3125 %

Local Memory - Total:  48 KB
Local Memory - One Array: 4.000000 KB
Number of Local Arrays: 2
Local Memory - All Arrays: 8.000000 KB
Local Memory - Usage: 16.6666666 %
share|improve this answer
    
Oh, I feel really dumb. Thank you so much for catching that! – benshope Oct 24 '13 at 23:40

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