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When I run this I get a NameError for 'is_number'. Is it possible to access a function in another function? How could I get 'is_number' to work?

class Bank_Account():
    account = 0
    def is_number(s):
        try:
            float(s)
            return True
        except ValueError:
            return False

    def deposit(self, amt):
        self.amt = amt
        if is_number(str(amt)):
            return "Invalid Input"
        else:

            self.account += float(amt)
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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You put is_number in the body of the class, making it a method.

You'll either need to move it out of the class body, or make it a proper method by giving it a self parameter, and then calling it on the instance with:

if self.is_number(amt):

Since your is_number function has little to do with the rest of the class, you can move it out:

def is_number(s):
    try:
        float(s)
        return True
    except ValueError:
        return False

class Bank_Account():
    account = 0

    def deposit(self, amt):
        self.amt = amt
        if is_number(amt):
            return "Invalid Input"
        else:
            self.account += float(amt)
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Yes, it is perfectly possible to access a function in another function.

The reason your code isn't working is that is_number is defined as a member function, or method, of the class Bank_Account.

This means that it needs to have a self parameter in the definition, and you need to call it as self.is_number.

Or, alternatively, you need to move it outside the class, so it's a global function.

(Or, even more alternatively, use @staticmethod.)

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@MartijnPieters: Which is why the answer says "That means that it needs to have a self parameter in the definition… Or, alternatively, you need to move it outside the class… Or… use @staticmethod." –  abarnert Oct 23 '13 at 23:11
    
sorry, indeed, you are mentioning that. –  Martijn Pieters Oct 23 '13 at 23:12

You define the function is_number within the class, so you need to call self.is_number.

class Bank_Account(object):

    def __init__(self):
        self.placeholder = None

    account = 0
    def is_number(s):
        try:
            float(s)
            return True
        except ValueError:
            return False

    def deposit(self, amt):
        self.amt = amt
        if self.is_number(str(amt)):
            return "Invalid Input"
        else:

            self.account += float(amt)
share|improve this answer
    
Why the leading underscore in self._is_number? And is_number() has no self parameter, so that'll not work, as it stands. –  Martijn Pieters Oct 23 '13 at 23:05
    
This will not work; is_number() has no self parameter, so you get TypeError: is_number() takes exactly 1 argument (2 given). –  Martijn Pieters Oct 23 '13 at 23:07
    
Bank_Account should have a self parameter. –  Michael Oct 23 '13 at 23:08
    
Your code is getting worse; __init__ has no body, so that's a IndentationError waiting to happen. Bank_Account is a class, it takes only base classes, not parameters. –  Martijn Pieters Oct 23 '13 at 23:10
    
Sorry, used to having other variables in the __init__ that then get defined in the body. What I meant was that if you create a Bank_Account object you should have a way to reference internally, which is typically to call it self. –  Michael Oct 23 '13 at 23:25

Try using isnumeric()? You have to change the value to a string first, though.

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1  
Why would isnumeric() work, when the function is called is_number()? –  Martijn Pieters Oct 23 '13 at 23:05

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