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The Django recommendation for dealing with user uploads is to store them on the filesystem and store the filesystem path in a database column. This works, but presents some problems I do not want to deal with:

  1. No transactions

  2. No simple way to keep the filesystem and database in sync

  3. Complicates backups since data is stored in 2 places

My solution is to store the image as a base64 encoded string in a text column (https://djangosnippets.org/snippets/1669/). This requires more space, but makes replication dead simple.

The concern with this approach is performance. Hitting the database for every image request is not desirable. I need some kind of server-side caching system together with reasonable caching headers. For example, if someone requests "/media/documents/earth.jpg", the cache should be consulted first and if the file is not found there the database should be hit.

Questions:

  1. What is a good cache tool for my purpose?

  2. Given these requirements is it required that every image request goes through my Django application? Or is there a caching tool that I can use to prevent this. I have certain files that can be accessed only by certain people. For these I assume the request must go through the application since there would be no other way to check for authorizaton.

  3. If this tool caches the files to the filesystem, then are hashed directories enough to mitigate the problem of having too many files in one directory? For example, a hashed directory path for elephant.gif could be /e/el/elephant.gif.

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Worked on a project where they did this once... One day we hit the point where the database just wouldn't grow anymore and had to switch. Caused major problems. I don't have a answer but my gut feeling is that by trying to simplify backup, you will end up with bigger problems in the future. How do you scale horizontally when all requests are forced to go through this database? With the images on the disk you can get the benefit of them being served through a CDN and avoid that scalability headache. Anyway good luck with whatever you choose, just trying to save you a headache down the line. –  Steve Sheldon Nov 12 '13 at 0:02
    
The intention is that something like a CDN will be used to store the files for serving, but the CDN is populated from the database. The files won't necessarily be served through the database. Clever uses of X-Sendfile can help here too. –  hekevintran Nov 12 '13 at 3:14

1 Answer 1

up vote 10 down vote accepted
+500

tl;dr: stop worrying and deliver, "premature optimization is the root of all evil"

The Django recommendation for dealing with user uploads is to store them on the filesystem and store the filesystem path in a database column.

The recommendation for using the file system is that you can have the images served directly by the web server instead of served by the application - web servers are very, very good at serving static files.

My solution is to store the image as a base64 encoded string in a text column (https://djangosnippets.org/snippets/1669/). This requires more space, but makes replication dead simple.

In general, replication is seldom used for static content. For a high traffic website, you have a dedicated server for static content - Django makes this very easy, that is what MEDIA_URL and STATIC_URL are for. Even if you are starting with the media served by the same web server, it is good practice to have it done by a separate virtual host (for example, have the app at http://www.example.com and the media at http://static.example.com even if serving both from the same machine).

Web servers are so good at serving static content that hardly you will need more than one. In practice you rarely hit the point where a dedicated server is not handling the load anymore, because by that time you will be using a CDN to cut your bandwidth bill, and the CDN will take most of the heat off the server.

If you choose to follow the "store on the file system" recommendation, don't worry about this until deployment, when the time arrives have a deployment expert at your side.

The concern with this approach is performance.

The performance hit you take when storing static content in the database is serving the image: it is somewhat negligible for small files - but for a large file, one app instance (or thread) will be stuck until the download finishes. Don't worry unless your images take too long to download.

Hitting the database for every image request is not desirable.

Honestly, why is that? Databases are designed to take hits. When you choose to store images in the database, performance is in the hands of the DBA now; as a developer you should stop thinking about it. When (and if) you hit any performance bottleneck related to database issues, consult a professional DBA, he will fix it.

1 - What is a good cache tool for my purpose?

Short story: this is static content, do the cache at the network layer (CDN, reverse caching proxy, etc). It is a problem for a professional network engineer, not for the developer.

There are many popular cache backends for Django, IMHO they are overkill for static content.

2 - Given these requirements is it required that every image request goes through my Django application? Or is there a caching tool that I can use to prevent this. I have certain files that can be accessed only by certain people. For these I assume the request must go through the application since there would be no other way to check for authorizaton.

Use an URL scheme that is unique and hard to guess, for example, with a path component made from a SHA2 hash of the file contents plus some secret token. Restrict service to requests refered by your site to avoid someone re-publishing the file URL. Use expiration headers if appropriate.

3 - If this tool caches the files to the filesystem, then are hashed directories enough to mitigate the problem of having too many files in one directory? For example, a hashed directory path for elephant.gif could be /e/el/elephant.gif.

Again, ask yourself why are you concerned. The cache layer should be transparent to the developer. I'm not aware of any popular cache solution for Django that don't have such basic concern very well covered.

[update]

Very good points. I understand that replication is seldom used for static content. That's not the point though. How often other people use replication for files has no effect on the fact that not replicating/backing up your database is wrong. Other people may be fine with losing ACID just because some bit of data is binary; I'm not. As far as I'm concerned these files are "of the database" because there are database columns whose values reference the files. If backing up hard drives is something seldom done, does that mean I shouldn't back up my hard drive? NO!

Your concern is valid, I was just trying to explain why Django developers have a bias for this arrangement (dedicated webserver for static content), Django started at the news publishing industry where this approach works well because of its ratio of one trusted publisher for thousands of readers.

It is important to note that the recommended approach (IMHO) is not in ACID violation. Ok, Django does not erase older images stored in the filesystem when the record changes or is deleted - but PostgreSQL don't really erase tuples from disk immediately when you delete records, they are just marked to be vacuumed later. Pity that Django lacks a built-in "vacuum" for images, but it is very hard to write a general one, so I side with the core team - data safety comes first. Look for example at database migrations: they took so long to have database migrations incorporated in Django because it is a hard problem as well. While writing a generic solution is hard, writing specific ones is trivial - for some projects I have a "garbage collector" process that I run from crontab in the low traffic hours, this script simply delete all files that are not referenced by metadata in the database - and this dirty cron job is enough consistency for me.

If you choose to store images at the database that is all fine. There are trade-offs, but rest assured you don't have to worry about them as a developer, it is a problem for the "ops" part of DevOps.

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Very good points. I understand that replication is seldom used for static content. That's not the point though. How often other people use replication for files has no effect on the fact that not replicating/backing up your database is wrong. Other people may be fine with losing ACID just because some bit of data is binary; I'm not. As far as I'm concerned these files are "of the database" because there are database columns whose values reference the files. If backing up hard drives is something seldom done, does that mean I shouldn't back up my hard drive? NO! –  hekevintran Nov 5 '13 at 15:46
    
@hekevintran: see my update - sorry if I sounded condescending, English is not my native Idiom. –  Paulo Scardine Nov 5 '13 at 17:10

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