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If someone can point me to a pre-existing question here, that'd be great. Turns out I'm having trouble finding this case.

Check out the SQL Fiddle to tinker with it. For the sake of SO search-ability, here is the schema and the question from the fiddle:

In my users table, I have a unique constraint on the country a user is assigned to (no more than one user per country). However, they may live wherever they choose.

START QUESTION

I only want to return users where the assigned country and domicile shows up only once across records, in this case record 4, where the duplication across columns is also not desired and there are no duplicates across rows. How?! :)

CREATE TABLE users
    (`id` int, 
     `country` varchar(255), 
     `domicile` varchar(255), UNIQUE(country)
    )
;

INSERT INTO users
    (`id`, `country`, `domicile`)
VALUES
    # Duplicate across column and row
    (1, "usa", "usa"),
    (2, "canada", "usa"),

    # Duplicate only across columns or no duplication
    (3, "mexico", "mexico"),
    (4, "uganda", "australia"),    

    # Duplicate only across rows
    (5, "germany", "portugal"),
    (6, "france", "portugal"),
    (7, "spain", "portugal")
;

Leave aside for the time being that a proper design would make this easier. I'm just trying to work with the hand that's been dealt. ;)

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If I understand correctly, you want to deduplicate across both country and domicile - so we need 2 steps:

SELECT
  MIN(id),
  country,
  domicile,
  COUNT(*) AS domnum
FROM (
  SELECT
    MIN(id) AS id,
    country,
    domicile,
    COUNT(*) AS counum
  FROM users
  GROUP BY country
  HAVING counum=1
) AS base
GROUP BY domicile
HAVING domnum=1

EDIT

With your test data, deduplication across domicile is sufficient, but I included both steps anyway.

EDIT

SQLfiddle

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Eugen, for getting at what I was asking for in spite of the faulty question and test data. Clearly I'm a bit tired after thinking about this one, but you and Barmar really helped me understand these nested selects much better. –  kries Oct 24 '13 at 0:49

I think this is the simplest way to do it:

SELECT *
FROM users
GROUP BY domicile
HAVING COUNT(*) = 1

FIDDLE

Unlike Eugen's answer, this one does depend on the fact that the country column has a unique constraint, so it only has to check domicile.

share|improve this answer
    
Really appreciate the attention to this question. You answered the faulty question correctly, though kudos to Eugen for taking some license with interpreting what I was asking and getting at the desire to deduplicate across both rows and columns. You both rock and helped me get at the solution. Thanks! –  kries Oct 24 '13 at 0:47
    
+1 for NOT failing to realize, that this is a single dedupe. Careful reading helps. –  Eugen Rieck Oct 24 '13 at 0:54

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