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I'm trying to go through a list of structs which consist of a string and an int. The strings are just lines that consist urls, and there are duplicates of some of the urls. They are in alphabetical order so any and all duplicates are right next to each other. The int is a counter used to count how many copies of a certain url there is. What I need to do is print out only a single instance of each url, along with a count of how many instances of that url were originally in the array. The thing I'm trying to figure out is how to remove all but one instance of each url I was wondering if someone might know a technique to do this.

Here is the code I have up to this point for this particular part of the program:

 void histogram(const int MaxPages, istream& input, ostream& output)
{


    string temp;
    int current = 0;
    CountedLocation *dynamicArray = new CountedLocation[MaxPages];
    int toBeMoved = current - 1;

    getline(input, temp);

    while(!input.eof())
    {

        temp = extractTheRequest(temp);
        toBeMoved = current-1;
        dynamicArray[current].locator = temp;
        if(isAGet(temp))
        {

            temp = extractLocator(temp);
            while (toBeMoved >= 0 && temp < dynamicArray[toBeMoved].locator)
            {
                dynamicArray[toBeMoved+1].locator = dynamicArray[toBeMoved].locator;
                dynamicArray[toBeMoved+1].counter = 1;
                --toBeMoved;
            }
            dynamicArray[toBeMoved+1].locator = temp;
            dynamicArray[toBeMoved+1].counter = 1;
        }

        current++;
        getline(input, temp);

    }
    for(int i=0; i < MaxPages; i++)
    {
        string temp = dynamicArray[i].locator;
        temp = "\"" + temp + "\"";

        dynamicArray[i].locator = temp;
    }
    //int tempMax = MaxPages;
    for(int i=0; i < current; i++)
    {
        if(search(dynamicArray, MaxPages, dynamicArray[i].locator) == search(dynamicArray, MaxPages, dynamicArray[i+1].locator))
        {
            int toBeMoved = i;
            dynamicArray[i+1].counter = dynamicArray[i].counter + 1;
            while (toBeMoved < current-1)
            {
                dynamicArray[toBeMoved] = dynamicArray[toBeMoved+1];
                ++toBeMoved;
            }
            --current;
            if(search(dynamicArray, MaxPages, dynamicArray[i].locator) == search(dynamicArray, MaxPages, dynamicArray[i+1].locator))
                continue;

       }
    }

    for(int i=0; i < current+1; i++)
    {
        cerr << dynamicArray[i].locator<< ", " << dynamicArray[i].counter << endl;
        output << dynamicArray[i].locator<< ", " << dynamicArray[i].counter << endl;
    }
  delete [] dynamicArray;

}
share|improve this question
2  
Show us your code please. – 0x499602D2 Oct 23 '13 at 23:56
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Create a new vector of your structures. Start at the beginning of your stream. Iterating through your stream, if the current string is different from the string in the last element in the vector, push an element initialized to that string to the back of the vector, setting the counter to one. Otherwise, just increment a counter associated to the last vector element. Move to the next string in the stream. Assuming the input string truly consists of already sorted strings, then at the end, the vector contains the unique strings with occurrence counts.

In pseudo-ish untested code:

std::vector<MyStruct> love_to_count (istream &input) {
    std::string url;
    std::vector<MyStruct> v;
    if (! (input >> url)) return v;
    v.push_back(MyStruct(url, 1));
    while (input >> url) {
        if (url != v.back().url) {
            v.push_back(MyStruct(url, 1));
        } else {
            v.back().count += 1;
        }
    }
    return v;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Admittedly I believe the program requirements ask that this task be done with a single dynamically allocated array, but how would this look in code just out of curiosity? – Matt Payne Oct 24 '13 at 0:50

Unless you're desperate for absolute maximum speed, I'd use an std::map.

std::map<std::string, int> URLs;

Read in the URL and the count. Use the URL as an index, and add the count:

URLs[URL] += count;

When you've read them all, you can write out the result:

for (auto const &u : URLs)
    std::cout << u.first << "\t" << u.second << "\n";

While it's possible to do this with a vector instead, it's more work, and if you're reading the data from a file the difference in speed is likely to be negligible (the time spent processing will be minor noise compared to the I/O time)

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