Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

First time poster, long time reader. I’m having a problem sorting an array of objects, this is homework so I’m not asking for someone to write the code for me just point me in the right direction or show me my over sight. The object is to write a function to sort an array of objects when passing in an array and a key ie:

([{a:2},{b:2},{a:1},{a:3},{b:3},{b:1}], “a”)

Should return

[{a:1},{a:2},{a:3},{b:1},{b:2},{b:3}];

I can’t use anything like underscore.js or node.js

    //example array to use
    var testarr = [{a:2},{b:2},{a:1},{a:3},{b:3},{b:1}];
    console.log("array sort test: should look like [{a:1},{a:2},{a:3},{b:1},{b:2},{b:3}]");

    //first attempt 
    var sortArrayByKey = function (arr1, key) {
            (arr1.sort(function(a,b){
            return a[key] - b[key];}));
            return arr1;
    };
    //still only returns testarr
    console.log(sortArrayByKey(testarr, "a") );

    //second attempt
    var sortArrayByKey1 = function (array, key) {
    var compareByKey = function (a, b) {
            var x = a[key]; var y = b[key];
            return x - y;
    }
    array.sort(compareByKey);        
    return array;
    };
    //still only returns testarr
    console.log(sortArrayByKey1(testarr, “a”));

![pic of requirements in-case i'm describing it wrong photo

share|improve this question
1  
sorry but what does the key have to do with sorting it? Are the keys just so supposed to be alphabetical, or is the key you pass supposed to be first? The problem as described is unclear. –  Ben McCormick Oct 24 '13 at 1:59
    
Sorry, a key of "a" will make a's be first or a key of "b" would make b's be first. like key "a" used, then [{a:1},{a:2},{a:3},{b:1},{b:2},{b:3}] is the return. If "b" is the key [{b:1},{b:2},{b:3},{a:1},{a:2},{a:3}] would be returned. –  stephen barker Oct 24 '13 at 2:04
    
Your objects have different keys. Since you're only passing "a", only those objects with an a: key will get a meaningful sort order. –  user2736012 Oct 24 '13 at 2:05
    
...by any chance are you confusing the a and b callback parameters with the a: and b: keys? –  user2736012 Oct 24 '13 at 2:07
1  
If you pass "a" as the key, do you expect it to put all the "b" objects in order, too? How is it supposed to know what their key is so it can look up the value? –  Barmar Oct 24 '13 at 2:15

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's my solution. I made it so you can also add more keys and sort them too.

Fiddle - http://jsfiddle.net/Q7Q9C/3/

function specialSort(arrayToSort, keyOrder) {
    arrayToSort = arrayToSort.sort(function (a, b) {
        for (var key in keyOrder) {
            if (!keyOrder.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
                continue;
            }
            var aKey = keyOrder[key];
            if (typeof a[aKey] === "undefined" && typeof b[aKey] === "undefined") {
                continue;
            }
            if (typeof a[aKey] !== "undefined" && typeof b[aKey] === "undefined") {
                return -1;
            }
            if (typeof a[aKey] === "undefined" && typeof b[aKey] !== "undefined") {
                return 1;
            }
            if (a[aKey] > b[aKey]) {
                return 1;
            }
            else if (a[aKey] < b[aKey]) {
                return -1;
            }
        }
        return 0;
    });
    return arrayToSort;
}
var arrayToSort = [
    {a:2},
    {b:2},
    {a:1},
    {a:3},
    {b:3},
    {c:3},
    {c:2},
    {b:1}
];
var keyOrder = ["a", "b", "c"];
var sortedArray = specialSort(arrayToSort, keyOrder);
console.log(JSON.stringify(sortedArray));
share|improve this answer
    
TypeError: keyOrder.reverse is not a function keyOrder = keyOrder.reverse(); –  stephen barker Oct 24 '13 at 2:52
    
@stephenbarker are you passing in an array as the second parameter to the function? keyOrder should be an array –  sissonb Oct 24 '13 at 2:59
    
That was my mistake, tonight is full of learning (remembering). Thanks that makes since now that I look at it again. –  stephen barker Oct 24 '13 at 3:08

Hmm.. this is a weird one. First you need to check if one of the keys is the priority key and sort based on that. Then if both keys are equal sort by the values. The problem is that there is no straightforward way to get the key but you can use the for .. in loop.

I'm going to assume that each object contains only one property otherwise the code will not make sense since property is unordered in objects:

function sortPreferredKey(arr,key) {
    arr.sort(function(a,b){
        // get the keys of each object
        for (var a_key in a) {break}
        for (var b_key in b) {break}
        if (a_key != b_key) {
            if (a_key == key) return 1;
            else if (b_key == key) return -1;
            else return 0;
        }
        return a[a_key] - b[b_key];
    });
}

I may have gotten the order of sort wrong but you get the idea. It's really weird that you'd even need to do something like this.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 I like your idiom to get the keys of each object -- I was stuck on that, so I punted in my answer. –  Barmar Oct 24 '13 at 2:25
    
This assumes objects will only ever have one key. And, this provides no sort among objects that don't have the desired key. Unclear what the OP wants to do in that case. –  jfriend00 Oct 24 '13 at 2:50
    
@jfriend00: That's deliberate - hence the return 0 since which key is first is defined by the user (sometimes b comes before a sometimes k comes before c or z). The user only specifies one key. To specify an order the argument would have to be an array. Since javascript's sort is stable, returning 0 ensures that the objects will retain previous order if none of the keys match the arguments. Therefore the user can call this funtion multiple times to first sort by b then by z then by m etc. –  slebetman Oct 24 '13 at 2:54
    
@slebetman - but what happens if the input data is [{a:1, b:-1}, {b:0, a:3}]? You're assuming the objects never have more than one property. That seems dangerous in the real world, particularly since the way you get the property on the object has no guarantee of order. –  jfriend00 Oct 24 '13 at 2:57
    
@jfriend00 His question doesn't really make sense if any of the elements can have more than one property, since he wants all the b's sorted among themselves behind the a's. –  Barmar Oct 24 '13 at 3:00

This is the best I can come up with. It will sort all the elements with the given key to the front; the elements without the key will be in the back, but they'll be in an unpredictable order.

function sortArrayByKey(arr, key) {
    function compareKey(a, b) {
        if (a.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
            if (b.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
                return a[key] - b[key];
            } else {
                return -1;
            }
        } else if (b.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
            return 1;
        } else {
            return 0;
        }
    }
    arr.sort(compareKey);
    return arr;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'll take it, it's the closest thing that works with out errors in firebug. So I was like 20% there, right idea, wrong tools hasOwnProperty now is added to my knowledge thank you. –  stephen barker Oct 24 '13 at 2:57

The documentation for the sort method is here. The compare function:

should be a function that accepts two arguments x and y and returns a negative value if x < y, zero if x = y, or a positive value if x > y.

The function is passed the values in the array, so it's like calling the function with:

compareFunction({a:2},{b:2});

What you seem to want to do is sort on the property name first, then on the value. The problem with that is that you can't guarantee what order the property names are returned in. In this case, if you have exactly one own property for each object, you can do:

// Return first own property returned by in
// ORDER IS NOT GUARANTEED
function getPropName(o) {
  for (var p in o) {
    if (o.hasOwnProperty(p)) {
      return p;
    }
  }
}

function specialSort(array, key) {
  array.sort(function (a, b) {
    var aProp = getPropName(a);
    var bProp = getPropName(b);
    // If properties are the same, compare value
    if (aProp == bProp) {
      return a[aProp] - b[bProp];
    }

    // Otherwise, compare keys
    return aProp == key? -1 : bProp == key? 1 : aProp.charCodeAt(0) - bProp.charCodeAt(0);
  });
  return array;
}

The above will also sort any other keys (c, d, e, etc.) after the preferred key so:

var a = [{c:3},{a:2},{b:2},{c:2},{a:1},{a:3},{b:3},{b:1},{c:1}]

specialSort(a, 'b'); // [{b:1}, {b:2}, {b:3}, {a:1}, {a:2}, {a:3}, {c:1}, {c:2}, {c:3}]
share|improve this answer

Here's a solution that makes a guess what to do if neither object being compared in the array has the passed in comparison key:

var data = [{a:2},{b:2},{a:1},{a:3},{b:3},{b:1}];

function sortByProperty(array, propName) {

    function findFirstProperty(obj) {
        for (x in obj) {
            if (obj.hasOwnProperty(x)) {
                return x;
            }
        }
    }

    return array.sort(function(first, second) {
        var firstHasProp = propName in first;
        var secondHasProp = propName in second;
        if (firstHasProp) {
            if (secondHasProp) {
                // both have the property
                return first[propName] - second[propName];
            } else {
                // only first has the property
                return -1;
            }
        } else if (secondHasProp){
            // only second has the property
            return 1;
        } else {
            // Neither sort candidate has the passed in property name
            // It is not clear what you want to do here as no other property
            //    name has been specified
            return first[findFirstProperty(first)] - second[findFirstProperty(second)]
        }
    });
}

Working demo: http://jsfiddle.net/jfriend00/PFurT/

Logically, here's what it does:

  1. If both comparison candidates have the desired property, then simply sort by the value of that property.
  2. If only one comparison candidate has the desired property, then make the one with the desired property be first in the sort order
  3. If neither comparison candidate has the desired property, find the first other property on the object and sort by that. This is a guess because you don't really explain what you want to happen in this case, but it works for the data example you provided.

Here's a version that works like the above one, but is has been extended to sort properties that are not the passed in property in alpha order and to deal with empty objects (with no properties) so they go at the end of the sort:

var data = [{c:4},{a:2},{b:2},{a:1},{a:3},{b:3},{b:1},{},{c:3}];

function sortByProperty(array, propName) {
    function findFirstProperty(obj) {
        for (x in obj) {
            if (obj.hasOwnProperty(x)) {
                return x;
            }
        }
    }
    return array.sort(function(first, second) {
        var firstHasProp = propName in first;
        var secondHasProp = propName in second;
        if (firstHasProp) {
            if (secondHasProp) {
                // both have the property
                return first[propName] - second[propName];
            } else {
                // only first has the property
                return -1;
            }
        } else if (secondHasProp){
            // only second has the property
            return 1;
        } else {
            // Neither sort candidate has the passed in property name
            // It is not clear what you want to do here as no other property
            //    name has been specified
            var firstProp = findFirstProperty(first);
            var secondProp = findFirstProperty(second);
            if (firstProp === undefined && secondProp === undefined) {
                return 0;
            } else if (firstProp === undefined) {
                return 1;
            } else if (secondProp === undefined) {
                return -1;
            }
            else if (firstProp === secondProp) {
                return first[firstProp] - second[secondProp];
            } else {
                return firstProp.localeCompare(secondProp);
            }
        }
    });
}

Working demo: http://jsfiddle.net/jfriend00/6QsVv/

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.