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For example:

(number-name 5513345) (five million five hundred thirteen thousand three hundred forty five)

I'm not really sure how to go about this??

I tried to do it and ended up with a series of case statements. The program will successfully print out the names of integers below ten but does little else.

(define numname 
  (lambda (n) 
    (if (= n 0)
        0 
        (cond ((= n 9) 'nine) 
              ((= n 8) 'eight) 
              ((= n 7) 'seven) 
              ((= n 6) 'six) 
              ((= n 5) 'five) 
              ((= n 4) 'four) 
              ((= n 3) 'three) 
              ((= n 2) 'two) 
              (else 'one))))) 
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1  
This looks like homework? –  ethree Oct 24 '13 at 4:13
    
What can you do? Can you print out the names of numbers below ten? Put the computer aside for a minute and try to write out an algorithm to go from a decimal number to its written representation. Then implement that algorithm in Scheme. –  zck Oct 24 '13 at 5:16
    
First of all thank you for your reply. I tried to do what you said and ended up with a series of case statements. The program will successfully print out the names of integers below ten but does little else. (define numname (lambda (n) (if (= n 0) 0 (cond ((= n 9) 'nine) ((= n 8) 'eight) ((= n 7) 'seven) ((= n 6) 'six) ((= n 5) 'five) ((= n 4) 'four) ((= n 3) 'three) ((= n 2) 'two) (else 'one))))) –  user2914067 Oct 24 '13 at 5:37
    
do you know about assoc? –  Will Ness Oct 24 '13 at 7:32
    
How do you do it by hand? When you need to go from 1234 to "one thousand two hundred thirty four", how do you do that? –  zck Oct 25 '13 at 21:22

1 Answer 1

You're on the right track. Take your example:

5513345

This is:

5 513 345

i.e:

five million five hundred thirteen thousand three hundred forty five

Which can be written as:

                        five   million
five  hundred       thirteen   thousand
three hundred forty     five   (units)

See a pattern emerging ? Your method works well for numbers below 10 (actually, you might want to go up to 19 as numbers between 10 and 20 have special name not following the Xty Y convention).

Once you have this, it should be easy to go up to 99

Once you have this, it is trivial to go up to 999

Once you have this, it's not even work to split your numbers into billion, million, thousands... and apply it again.

Happy coding !

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