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The following code is causing me issues:

class Foo
  def initialize(n=0)
    @n = n
  end

  attr_accessor :n

  def inc
    n+=1
  end
end

Calling Foo.new.inc raises NoMethodError: undefined method '+' for nil:NilClass Calling Foo.new.n returns 0

Why does Foo.new.inc raise an error? I can do Foo.new.n+=1 with no problem.

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1  
So use @n, then? Or self.n? –  minitech Oct 24 '13 at 4:40
1  
n += x expands to n = n + x where n is bound as a local variable because it appears on the left-hand side. –  user2864740 Oct 24 '13 at 4:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

tldr; some form of self.n = x must always be used to assign to a setter.

Consider that n += x expands to n = n + x where n is bound as a local variable because it appears on the left-hand side of an assignment. This "introduction" of a local variable counteracts the normal fall-back behavior of an implicit method call (e.g. n -> self.n) upon self.

Thus, since n has not been assigned yet (but it is bound as a local variable now), the expression evaluates as n = nil + x which is what causes the exception to be raised.

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even if you didn't assign to n, where would you read from? ReferenceError. –  Jan Dvorak Oct 24 '13 at 4:49
1  
@JanDvorak Whoops, it would be a NameError if n was used prior to any assignment. I removed the incorrect last paragraph. –  user2864740 Oct 24 '13 at 4:52
    
"normal fall-back behavior of an implicit self method call" - reference please? I'm pretty sure this only works for Kernel. –  Jan Dvorak Oct 24 '13 at 4:53
    
@JanDvorak If there is an identifier, say, n that is not a local/lexical variable then, where it does not appear on the left-hand side of an assignment, it is treated as self.n (an implicit self method call). –  user2864740 Oct 24 '13 at 4:54
1  
@JanDvorak Using self.n += x will work: whenever a setter is used it must be invoked upon an explicit receiver such (e.g. self). It's just something to keep in mind when using Ruby. (On the other hand, a language like Python requires an explicit receiver for every method call.) –  user2864740 Oct 24 '13 at 4:58

Use this

def inc
  self.n += 1
end

or this

def inc
  @n += 1
end

In your case, naked name "n" is interpreted as a local variable (which does not exist). You need to specify explicitly that it is a method (self.n) or use underlying instance variable.

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self.n will only work if @n has a reader and a writer (and they behave as expected). I assume the latter form is the preferred one? –  Jan Dvorak Oct 24 '13 at 4:42
1  
@JanDvorak: attr_accessor does that, right? –  minitech Oct 24 '13 at 4:43
1  
It does have a reader in this case. –  Logan Serman Oct 24 '13 at 4:43
    
@minitech it does that in this case, but I'm afraid this would be a rather unusual occurence. I, for one, would make @n unwritable. –  Jan Dvorak Oct 24 '13 at 4:45
    
I'd mark both answers write if I could. Not sure why I missed the obvious solution, but it definitely threw me for a loop –  Davd_R Oct 24 '13 at 5:34

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