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This just for general knowledge:

If I have two, let's say, List, and I want to iterate both with the same foreach loop, can we do that?

Edit

Just to clarify, I wanted to do this:

List<String> listA = new List<string> { "string", "string" };
List<String> listB = new List<string> { "string", "string" };

for(int i = 0; i < listA.Count; i++)
    listB[i] = listA[i];

But with a foreach =)

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Wow! thanks to all for your comments!. I though the only way was to use a good old "for" loop but thanks for your hacks! –  Hugo Dec 23 '09 at 22:58
2  
The important word here is "zip". –  Mark Byers Dec 23 '09 at 23:10
1  
Do you want to iterate two lists in parallel? Or do you want to iterate first one list, and then the other one (with a single statement)? –  Pavel Minaev Dec 23 '09 at 23:35
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8 Answers 8

up vote 73 down vote accepted

This is known as a Zip operation and will be supported in .NET 4.

With that, you would be able to write something like:

var numbers = new [] { 1, 2, 3, 4 };
var words = new [] { "one", "two", "three", "four" };

var numbersAndWords = numbers.Zip(words, (n, w) => new { Number = n, Word = w });
foreach(var nw in numbersAndWords)
{
    Console.WriteLine(nw.Number + nw.Word);
}
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1  
Here's an article on it: community.bartdesmet.net/blogs/bart/archive/2008/11/03/… –  James Kolpack Dec 23 '09 at 23:01
    
Did not know anything about those Zip operations, I'll make a small research on that topic. Thanks! –  Hugo Dec 23 '09 at 23:02
3  
@Hugo: It's a standard construct in Functional Programming :) –  Mark Seemann Dec 23 '09 at 23:03
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If you don't want to wait for .NET 4.0, you could implement your own Zip method. The following works with .NET 2.0. You can adjust the implementation depending on how you want to handle the case where the two enumerations (or lists) have different lengths: this one continues to the end of the longer enumeration, returning the default values for missing items from the shorter enumeration.

    static IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<T, U>> Zip<T, U>(IEnumerable<T> first, IEnumerable<U> second)
    {
        IEnumerator<T> firstEnumerator = first.GetEnumerator();
        IEnumerator<U> secondEnumerator = second.GetEnumerator();

        while (firstEnumerator.MoveNext())
        {
            if (secondEnumerator.MoveNext())
            {
                yield return new KeyValuePair<T, U>(firstEnumerator.Current, secondEnumerator.Current);
            }
            else
            {
                yield return new KeyValuePair<T, U>(firstEnumerator.Current, default(U));
            }
        }
        while (secondEnumerator.MoveNext())
        {
            yield return new KeyValuePair<T, U>(default(T), secondEnumerator.Current);
        }
    }

    static void Test()
    {
        IList<string> names = new string[] { "one", "two", "three" };
        IList<int> ids = new int[] { 1, 2, 3, 4 };

        foreach (KeyValuePair<string, int> keyValuePair in ParallelEnumerate(names, ids))
        {
            Console.WriteLine(keyValuePair.Key ?? "<null>" + " - " + keyValuePair.Value.ToString());
        }
    }
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1  
Nice method! :). You can make a few adjustments to use the same signature as .NET 4 Zip method msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd267698.aspx and return resultSelector(first, second) instead of a KVP. –  tinchou Jun 12 '13 at 19:17
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You can use Union or Concat, the former removes duplicates, the later doesn't

foreach (var item in List1.Union(List1))
{
   //TODO: Real code goes here
}

foreach (var item in List1.Concat(List1))
{
   //TODO: Real code goes here
}
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This will not work if they are lists of different types. –  Mark Seemann Dec 23 '09 at 23:01
    
Another problem with using a Union is that it may throw away instances if they evaluate as being equal. That may not always be what you want. –  Mark Seemann Dec 23 '09 at 23:04
    
I tough that his intention was to use collections with the same type, –  albertein Dec 23 '09 at 23:05
    
@Mark Seemann, i already pointed that, he could also use Concat –  albertein Dec 23 '09 at 23:06
    
Like Union, Concat only works if both lists are of the same type. Can't tell if this is what the OP needs or not, though... –  Mark Seemann Dec 23 '09 at 23:07
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Here's a custom IEnumerable<> extension method that can be used to loop through two lists simultaneously.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
	public static class LinqCombinedSort
	{
		public static void Test()
		{
			var a = new[] {'a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f'};
			var b = new[] {3, 2, 1, 6, 5, 4};

			var sorted = from ab in a.Combine(b)
						 orderby ab.Second
						 select ab.First;

			foreach(char c in sorted)
			{
				Console.WriteLine(c);
			}
		}

		public static IEnumerable<Pair<TFirst, TSecond>> Combine<TFirst, TSecond>(this IEnumerable<TFirst> s1, IEnumerable<TSecond> s2)
		{
			using (var e1 = s1.GetEnumerator())
			using (var e2 = s2.GetEnumerator())
			{
				while (e1.MoveNext() && e2.MoveNext())
				{
					yield return new Pair<TFirst, TSecond>(e1.Current, e2.Current);
				}
			}

		}


	}
	public class Pair<TFirst, TSecond>
	{
		private readonly TFirst _first;
		private readonly TSecond _second;
		private int _hashCode;

		public Pair(TFirst first, TSecond second)
		{
			_first = first;
			_second = second;
		}

		public TFirst First
		{
			get
			{
				return _first;
			}
		}

		public TSecond Second
		{
			get
			{
				return _second;
			}
		}

		public override int GetHashCode()
		{
			if (_hashCode == 0)
			{
				_hashCode = (ReferenceEquals(_first, null) ? 213 : _first.GetHashCode())*37 +
							(ReferenceEquals(_second, null) ? 213 : _second.GetHashCode());
			}
			return _hashCode;
		}

		public override bool Equals(object obj)
		{
			var other = obj as Pair<TFirst, TSecond>;
			if (other == null)
			{
				return false;
			}
			return Equals(_first, other._first) && Equals(_second, other._second);
		}
	}

}
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I understand/hope that the lists have the same length: No, your only bet is going with a plain old standard for loop.

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No, you would have to use a for-loop for that.

for (int i = 0; i < lst1.Count; i++)
{
    //lst1[i]...
    //lst2[i]...
}

You can't do something like

foreach (var objCurrent1 int lst1, var objCurrent2 in lst2)
{
    //...
}
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What if they have different counts? –  Drew Noakes Dec 23 '09 at 23:09
    
Then a foreach which would accept an arbitrary list of enumerables wouldn't work as well, thus rendering the whole thing useless. –  Maximilian Mayerl Dec 23 '09 at 23:10
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If you want one element with the corresponding one you could do

Enumerable.Range(0, List1.Count).All(x => List1[x] == List2[x]);

That will return true if every item is equal to the corresponding one on the second list

If that's almost but not quite what you want it would help if you elaborated more.

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This method would work for a list implementation and could be implemented as an extension method.

public void TestMethod()
{
    var first = new List<int> {1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
    var second = new List<string> {"One", "Two", "Three", "Four", "Five"};

    foreach(var value in this.Zip(first, second, (x, y) => new {Number = x, Text = y}))
    {
        Console.WriteLine("{0} - {1}",value.Number, value.Text);
    }
}

public IEnumerable<TResult> Zip<TFirst, TSecond, TResult>(List<TFirst> first, List<TSecond> second, Func<TFirst, TSecond, TResult> selector)
{
    if (first.Count != second.Count)
        throw new Exception();  

    for(var i = 0; i < first.Count; i++)
    {
        yield return selector.Invoke(first[i], second[i]);
    }
}
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