Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

After reading, I came to know that, arrays in Java are objects. The name of the array is not the actual array, but just a reference. The new operator creates the array on the heap and returns the reference to the newly created array object which is then assigned to array variable (name). Something like the following:

int[] myArray = new int[5];

But I also used these two type of array declaration.

int[] myArray= new int[]{5,7,3};

and

int[] myArray= {5,7,3};

Both of the above are legal and work fine. So what's the difference between these two and when should I use them?

share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of Difference between array declaration –  RAS Oct 24 '13 at 6:11
2  
Tried to fix the typo, and it turns out there's already another question with title "Array declaration in Java." Usually a sign that the question is either really vague or has been asked before. –  Dennis Meng Oct 24 '13 at 6:20

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This generates an array of size 5, with 5 null elements:

int[] myArray = new int[5];

If the values aren't something you know at compile time, this is probably more useful. E.g.

int[] myArray = new int[blah.size()];
for (int i = 0; i < blah.size() ; i++) {
  myArray[i] = getFoo(blah.get(i));
}

If you knew the size ahead of time, you could use the other form.

int[] myArray = {blah.get(0), blah.get(1), blah.get(2)};

The following are equivalent (compile to the same bytecode), and generate an array with inferred size 3, with three elements, 5, 7, and 3. This form is useful if there are fixed set of values, or at least a fixed size set of values.

int[] myArray = new int[]{5,7,3};
int[] myArray = {5,7,3};

Otherwise you could accomplish the same thing with the longer form:

int[] myArray = new int[5];
myArray[0] = 5;
myArray[1] = 7;
myArray[2] = 3;

But this is unnecessarily verbose. But if you don't know how many things there are, you have to use the first form.

share|improve this answer

Please follow comments

int[] myArray = new int[5]; //memory allocated for 5 integers  with nulls as values


int[] myArray= new int[]{5,7,3}; //memory allocated for 3 integers  with  values


int[] myArray= {5,7,3}; // same as above with different syntax memory allocated for 3integers  with  values.

Diffrerence between second and third style.

      someX(new int[] {1,2,3}); //  inline creation array  style
      someX(declaredArray);     // using some declared array
      someX({1,2,3});     //Error. Sorry boss, I don't know the type of array


      private  void someX(int[] param){
          // do something
      }
share|improve this answer
    
So what's the difference between the last two and when should I use which? –  Thilo Oct 24 '13 at 6:08
    
@Thilo No difference, Matter of syntax and contex. Added a small example. Hope that helps –  sᴜʀᴇsʜ ᴀᴛᴛᴀ Oct 24 '13 at 6:15
    
+1 nice answer. –  Rakesh Jul 2 '14 at 7:48

According to the bytecode of both cases, there is no difference. In both cases, 3 length spaces allocated and values are assigned.

int[] myArray= new int[]{5,7,3};

public class array.ArrayTest {
  public array.ArrayTest();
    Code:
       0: aload_0
       1: invokespecial #8                  //
()V
       4: return

  public static void main(java.lang.String[]);
    Code:
       0: iconst_3
       1: newarray       int
       3: dup
       4: iconst_0
       5: iconst_5
       6: iastore
       7: dup
       8: iconst_1
       9: bipush        7
      11: iastore
      12: dup
      13: iconst_2
      14: iconst_3
      15: iastore
      16: astore_1
      17: return
}

int[] myArray= {5,7,3};

public class array.ArrayTest {
  public array.ArrayTest();
    Code:
       0: aload_0
       1: invokespecial #8                  //
()V
       4: return

  public static void main(java.lang.String[]);
    Code:
       0: iconst_3
       1: newarray       int
       3: dup
       4: iconst_0
       5: iconst_5
       6: iastore
       7: dup
       8: iconst_1
       9: bipush        7
      11: iastore
      12: dup
      13: iconst_2
      14: iconst_3
      15: iastore
      16: astore_1
      17: return
}
share|improve this answer
int[] myArray = new int[5];

In this we are specifying the length five to an array

int[] myArray= new int[]{5,7,3};

In this we are passing three elements and then specifying the length three.

int[] myArray= {5,7,3};

In this we are passing the element which will automatically specified the length three.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.