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Anyone can give me a full example of this code? Why the result total is 21 (ie the sum of current) if I print total???

end=6
total = 0
current = 1
while current <= end:
    total += current
    current += 1

print total
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closed as unclear what you're asking by progo, Daniel Roseman, FallenAngel, Jon Clements, Srinivas Reddy Thatiparthy Oct 24 '13 at 10:59

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3  
Why do you think the result wouldn't be 21? –  DSM Oct 24 '13 at 10:48
    
Because I think to find the sum I need to sum the results of total and not of current. Can you give me a an explanation? –  Overnet Oct 24 '13 at 10:52
1  
@Overnet what do you think total += current is doing? –  Jon Clements Oct 24 '13 at 10:52
    
But summing the partial totals would give 1 + (1+2) + (1+2+3) + (1+2+3+4) + (1+2+3+4+5) + (1+2+3+4+5+6). For all I know that's what you really want, but it's something different. –  DSM Oct 24 '13 at 10:54
    
Thanks. I know. To find the result I need to sum the current because total += current ? It's true? –  Overnet Oct 24 '13 at 10:59

3 Answers 3

Because 1+2+3+4+5+6 is 21. Why is that mysterious?

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Yes, I know that. But I don't understand why I sum the results of current and not of total. –  Overnet Oct 24 '13 at 10:54
    
Thanks. I know. To find the result I need to sum the current because total += current ? It's true? –  Overnet Oct 24 '13 at 11:11
2  
@Overnet: total += current is equivalent (in this context) to total = total + current, So in each iteration, you're adding the value of current to total. –  Tim Pietzcker Oct 24 '13 at 11:18
    
Thank you very much:) –  Overnet Oct 24 '13 at 14:25

You can usually get to the bottom of this sort of thing by introducing some basic debugging. I have added a print inside the loop of your code so that you can see what is happening after each iteration:

end=6
total = 0
current = 1
while current <= end:
    total += current
    current += 1
    print "total: ", total, "\tcurrent: ", current 

print total

The output is:

total:  1   current:  2
total:  3   current:  3
total:  6   current:  4
total:  10  current:  5
total:  15  current:  6
total:  21  current:  7
21

To summaries what is happening here, total and current are initialised to 0 and 1 respectively, on the first loop total is set using total += current (which is equivalent to total = total + current) i.e. total = 0+1, then current is incremented by 1 to 2 so after the first loop they are 1 & 2 respectively.

On the second loop total += current would be evaluated as total = 1+2 (the values as of the end of the previous loop) and so on.

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Thanks. I know. To find the result I need to sum the current because total += current ? It's true? –  Overnet Oct 24 '13 at 11:12
    
@Overnet Sorry, I am not completely clear what you are asking here, I have updated my answer with a further explanation which will hopefully clear things up. Let me know if there is still any confusion. –  ChrisProsser Oct 24 '13 at 11:28

What have you expect? 1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 = 21

here are are the start values and the values of each loop

total   0 -> 1 -> 3 -> 6 -> 10 -> 15 -> 21
current 1 -> 2 -> 3 -> 4 ->  5 ->  6 ->  7
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Yes I know that. But the sum of this result is because there is write total += current? –  Overnet Oct 24 '13 at 11:09
1  
"total += current" is the same as "total = total + current". I hope that helps you –  Jan Meisel Oct 24 '13 at 11:52
    
Yes it's this :) –  Overnet Oct 24 '13 at 14:26

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