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Let us suppose that I have a thread that consumes items produced by another thread. Its run method is as follows, with inQueue being a BlockingQueue

boolean shutdown = false;
while (!shutdown) {
    try {
        WorkItem w = inQueue.take();
        w.consume();
    } catch (InterruptedException e) { 
        shutdown = true;
    }
}

Furthermore, a different thread will signal that there are no more work items by interrupting this running thread. Will take() throw an interrupted exception if it does not need to block to retrieve the next work item. i.e. if the producer signals that it is done filling the work queue, is it possible to accidentally leave some items in inQueue or miss the interrupt?

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You've almost got it right. Rather than having the consumer set "shutdown" to true upon interruption, instead have the producer set it to true before interrupting the consumer. Note this A) keeps things pretty by avoiding a sentinel value ("poison pill"), B) correctly handles spurious wakeups, and C) is more general in that you can deliberately halt the consumer whether or not the queue is empty. –  user359996 Aug 9 '12 at 20:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A good way to signal termination of a blocking queue is to submit a 'poison' value into the queue that indicates a shutdown has occurred. This ensures that the expected behavior of the queue is honored. Calling Thread.interupt() is probably not a good idea if you care about clearing the queue.

To provide some code:

boolean shutdown = false;
while (!shutdown) {
    try {
        WorkItem w = inQueue.take();
        if (w == QUEUE_IS_DEAD)
          shutdown = true;
        else
          w.consume();
    } catch (InterruptedException e) { 
        // possibly submit QUEUE_IS_DEAD to the queue
    }
}
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This seems to work best. From what I can tell in rare cases the 'done' interrupt can be delivered before take() wakes due to more stuff being in the queue. To guard against this, I had to drain the queue with a second loop anyway. –  Ryan Dec 24 '09 at 20:00

According to http://java.sun.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/concurrent/BlockingQueue.html#take%28%29

The take() method will throw InterruptedException if interrupted while waiting.

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I wondered about the same thing and reading the javadoc for take() I believed that it would throw an interrupted exception only after having taken all the items in the queue, since if the queue had items, it would not have to "wait". But I made a small test:

package se.fkykko.slask;
import java.util.concurrent.ArrayBlockingQueue;
import java.util.concurrent.BlockingQueue;
import java.util.concurrent.atomic.AtomicLong;

public class BlockingQueueTakeTest {

public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
    Runner t = new Runner();
    Thread t1 = new Thread(t);
    for (int i = 0; i < 50; i++) {
        t.queue.add(i);
    }
    System.out.println(("Number of items in queue: " + t.queue.size()));
    t1.start();
    Thread.sleep(1000);
    t1.interrupt();
    t1.join();
    System.out.println(("Number of items in queue: " + t.queue.size()));
    System.out.println(("Joined t1. Finished"));

}

private static final class Runner implements Runnable {
    BlockingQueue<Integer> queue = new ArrayBlockingQueue<Integer>(100);
    AtomicLong m_count = new AtomicLong(0);

    @Override
    public void run() {
        try {
            while (true) {
                queue.take();
                System.out.println("Took item " + m_count.incrementAndGet());
                final long start = System.currentTimeMillis();
                while ((System.currentTimeMillis() - start) < 100) {
                    Thread.yield(); //Spin wait
                }
            }
        }
        catch (InterruptedException ex) {
            System.out.println("Interrupted. Count: " + m_count.get());
        }
    }
}

}

The runner will take 10-11 items and then finish i.e. take() will throw InterruptedException even if there still is items in the queue.

Summary: Use the Poison pill approach instead, then you have full control over how much is left in the queue.

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The java.concurrency.utils package was designed and implemented by some of the finest minds in concurrent programming. Also, interrupting threads as a means to terminate them is explicitly endorsed by their book "Java Concurrency in Practice". Therefore, I would be extremely surprised if any items were left in the queue due to an interrupt.

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2  
Try it in a test and be "extremely surprised" ;-) –  FkYkko Jul 8 '11 at 15:28
    
"Smart people made it" plus "interrupt() interrupts threads" does not entail "blocking queues don't check interrupt status until they're empty". For example, at least one implementation (cf. grepcode.com/file/repository.grepcode.com/java/root/jdk/openjdk/…) of ArrayBlockingQueue calls ReentrantLock.lockInterruptibly(), which checks the thread's interrupt status (throwing an InterruptedException if interrupted) before trying to get the next element. –  user359996 Aug 9 '12 at 20:56

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