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Is it possible to copy a single file to multiple directories using the cp command ?

I tried the following , which did not work:

cp file1 /foo/ /bar/
cp file1 {/foo/,/bar}

I know it's possible using a for loop, or find. But is it possible using the gnu cp command?

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14 Answers 14

up vote 36 down vote accepted

No, cp can copy multiple sources but will only copy to a single destination. You need to arrange to invoke cp multiple times - once per destination - for what you want to do; using, as you say, a loop or some other tool.

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Thanks for the answer! Now that I think about it a bit more, without extra flags (which do not exist) cp will not know what is the source and what is the DEST dir. –  Tom Feiner Oct 12 '08 at 16:39
4  
This is not the correct answer. Please see Robert Gamble's answer. –  Nocturne Feb 3 '13 at 21:26
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@Nocturne: which part of what I said is incorrect? Robert gives an example of using another tool to invoke cp multiple times as I suggest. There are many possible solutions that involve using other tools or constructs to do that, but the OP did indicate he was already aware that is possible. –  moonshadow Feb 3 '13 at 22:38
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Sad, it would be great for cp (and scp) to support that feature. Yet we can use tee to do the split. superuser.com/questions/32630/… –  Simon Mar 13 '13 at 16:42

You can't do this with cp alone but you can combine cp with xargs:

echo dir1 dir2 dir3 | xargs -n 1 cp file1

Will copy file1 to dir1, dir2, and dir3. xargs will call cp 3 times to do this, see the man page for xargs for details.

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33  
This answer is so much more helpful than the accepted answer. –  Lee DeLapp Jul 24 '12 at 23:43
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This answer doesn't answer the actual question. –  Simon Mar 13 '13 at 16:45
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More information on xargs: cyberciti.biz/faq/… –  Chris B May 2 '13 at 20:26
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@Simon how so? "You can't do this with cp alone" Just because the answer attempted to be helpful by suggesting another way does not mean the question was not answered. –  NickC Oct 8 '13 at 2:51
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Stipulating that answers be accepted based on whether they technically answer the question would be insufferably pedantic and not really useful. –  Backgammon Mar 13 at 14:51

Wildcards also work with Roberts code

echo ./fs*/* | xargs -n 1 cp test 
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As far as I can see it you can use the following:

ls | xargs -n 1 cp -i file.dat

The -i option of cp command means that you will be asked whether to overwrite a file in the current directory with the file.dat. Though it is not a completely automatic solution it worked out for me.

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While it is good to have added the -i guard, won't that prompt you about over writing every file? rather than copying to the directories? –  Hedgehog Dec 11 '12 at 2:32
    
@Hedgehog Well, I think that this command is useful when there is a file in the directory and one wants to copy it to subdirectories of the directory. In this case a file can be overwritten only once. Thanks for your question! –  Evgeny Jan 14 '13 at 7:19
    
For me, it printed a series of cp: overwrite questions, but I didn't have to answer any of them, and it didn't overwrite the files. –  Evgeni Sergeev Jan 30 at 6:48

I would use cat and tee based on the answers I saw at http://superuser.com/questions/32630/parallel-file-copy-from-single-source-to-multiple-targets instead of cp.

For example:

cat <inputfile> | tee <outfile1> <outfile2> > /dev/null
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Another way is to use cat and tee as follows: cat | tee | tee [...] >

I think this would be pretty inefficient though, since the job would be split among several processes (one per destination) and the hard drive would be writing several files at once over different parts of the platter. However if you wanted to write a file out to several different drives, this method would probably be pretty efficient (as all copies could happen concurrently).

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Tee can accept multiple output files per invocation. –  Samuel Edwin Ward Jun 5 '13 at 15:27

No - you cannot.

I've found on multiple occasions that I could use this functionality so I've made my own tool to do this for me.

http://github.com/ddavison/branch

pretty simple -
branch myfile dir1 dir2 dir3

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There are often scenarios where I would write my own such script, but I tend to use so many machines nowadays that keeping them all in sync seems like a major hassle. If only there was a way to mount a cloud web directory to /e for example, just once on each machine, then I could write my own powertools and keep them forever. –  Evgeni Sergeev Jan 30 at 6:34

if you want to copy multiple folders to multiple folders one can do something like this:

echo dir1 dir2 dir3 | xargs -n 1 cp -r /path/toyourdir/{subdir1,subdir2,subdir3}

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This will copy to the immediate sub-directories, if you want to go deeper, adjust the -maxdepth parameter.

find . -mindepth 1 -maxdepth 1 -type d| xargs -n 1 cp -i index.html

If you don't want to copy to all directories, hopefully you can filter the directories you are not interested in. Example copying to all folders starting with a

find . -mindepth 1 -maxdepth 1 -type d| grep \/a |xargs -n 1 cp -i index.html

If copying to a arbitrary/disjoint set of directories you'll need Robert Gamble's suggestion.

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If you need to be specific on into which folders to copy the file you can combine find with one or more greps. For example to replace any occurences of favicon.ico in any subfolder you can use:

find . | grep favicon\.ico | xargs -n 1 cp -f /root/favicon.ico
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ls -db di*/subdir | xargs -n 1 cp File

-b in case there is a space in directory name otherwise it will be broken as a different item by xargs, had this problem with the echo version

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If you want to do it without a forked command:

tee <inputfile file2 file3 file4 ... >/dev/null

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Essentially equivalent to the xargs answer, but in case you want parallel execution:

parallel -q cp file1 ::: /foo/ /bar/

So, for example, to copy file1 into all subdirectories of current folder (including recursion):

parallel -q cp file1 ::: `find -mindepth 1 -type d`

N.B.: This probably only conveys any noticeable speed gains for very specific use cases, e.g. if each target directory is a distinct disk.

It is also functionally similar to the '-P' argument for xargs.

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For example if you are in the parent directory of you destination folders you can do:

for i in $(ls); do cp sourcefile $i; done

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The question says it's possible with a for loop, so this really doesn't add anything. –  LarsNielsen May 8 '13 at 21:58
    
Downvoted. Never try to parse the output of ls, and always quote variables. for i in ./*; do cp sourcefile "$i"; done –  sebleblanc Oct 18 '13 at 21:24

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