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I cannot get a false value to return here. A true value returns fine. What am I missing?

if ((count($this->_brokenRulesCollection)) == 0)  {
    return true;
} else {
    return false;
}
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unclear question, not enough code. – just somebody Dec 24 '09 at 3:48
    
I suppose it would be a tad insulting to ask you if count($this->_brokenRulesCollection) is actually non-zero. – paxdiablo Dec 24 '09 at 3:49
    
I'd rather see return ($this->_brokenRulesCollection == 0);, but is the variable ever non-zero? – Jim H. Dec 24 '09 at 3:50
1  
$this->_brokenRulesCollection is an array of objects. I can force it to be 1 or 0. When I force it to be 1, I get no return value. Perhaps it would be better to ask what I should expect to be returned when it evaluates to false. If I echo out the return value on the calling object when the function returns a true value, I get a 1. Otherwise, when I echo out the return value I get nada. I'm expecting it to be 0 for false. – Stepppo Dec 24 '09 at 3:55
up vote 8 down vote accepted

In PHP, false when converted to a string is an empty string, and true converted to a string is "1".

Use var_dump instead of echo for debugging.

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Most obliged, Nicolas. +1 for the reminder to use var_dump. <slaps forehead> – Stepppo Dec 24 '09 at 4:13

The code can just return false if the array $this->_brokenRulesCollection is not empty.

If $this->_brokenRulesCollection is not an array or an object with implemented Countable interface, then count($this->_brokenRulesCollection) will returned 1.

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So, would it be better to test for empty instead? Basically, I just need to know if the array has anything in it and if it does, it should return false. – Stepppo Dec 24 '09 at 4:08
    
Yes. Using empty($this->_brokenRulesCollection) would return false if $this->_brokenRulesCollection is not empty. empty cannot be used as in empty(trim($name)), which would return an error. Also, in PHP, if ((count($array)) == 0) can be written as if (!count($array)), and the code you reported can be simply written as return !count($this->_brokenRulesCollection). For the boolean operators (!, &&, ||), any value that is NOT an empty string, an array without items, an integer equal to zero, NULL, the string '0' is considered equivalent to TRUE. – kiamlaluno Dec 24 '09 at 15:40
    
(follow-up) In example, the expression 1 && "Not empty string" returns TRUE. – kiamlaluno Dec 24 '09 at 15:42

In conditional expressions (unless you use the type matching operators === or !==) any non-zero integer is equivalent to true, any non-zero length string is equivalent to true and conversely, zero or a blank string are false.

So

if ((count($this->_brokenRulesCollection)) == 0)  {
   return true;
} else {
  return false;
}

Can be written as just:

return count($this->_brokenRulesCollection);

C.

share|improve this answer

if you actually want to see "false", put the value in a variable before you return. as such:

if ((count($this->_brokenRulesCollection)) == 0)  {
    $value=true;
} else {
    $value=false;
}
return $value;
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2  
This is incorrect; there is no need to store the return value in a variable before returning it. – Joni Sep 23 '12 at 14:33

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