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I am attempting to work through the exercises in "Foundations of Computer Science, C Edition". The code below is directly from the book, but when I try to include and use it as they desctibe I get complier errors.

#define DefCell(EltType, CellType, ListType)
typedef struct CellType *ListType;
struct CellType {
    EltType element;
    ListType next;
};

/*************************************************
 *  DefCell(int, CELL, LIST);
 *
 *  expands to:
 *
 *  typedef struct CELL *LIST;
 *  struct CELL {
 *      int element;
 *      LIST next;
 *  }
 *
 *  as a consequence we can use CELL as the type of integer cells
 *  and we can use LISTas the type of pointers to these cells.
 *
 *  CELL c;
 *  LIST l;
 *
 * defines c to be a cell and l to be a pointer to a cell.
 * Note that the representation of a list of cells is normally
 * a pointer to the first cell on the list, or NULL if the list
 * is empty.
 *
 ****************************************************/ 

(The book can be downloaded for free - this code is on page 23.)

I have also tried to use the template to solve one of the exercises(2.2.3):

DefCell(char, LETTER, STRING);

BOOLEAN FirstString(STRING s1, STRING s2);

The errors I get are:

selectionsort.c:22:2: error: expected specifier-qualifier-list before ‘EltType’
selectionsort.c:60:28: error: expected ‘)’ before ‘s1’
selectionsort.c:133:28: error: expected ‘)’ before ‘s1’

I understand that the compiler doesn't know that STRING or EltType is a type, but what I don't understand is why not? The book is somewhat old, so it may be that C programming has moved on from the technique in the book. It is also possible I am just misunderstanding some key element of the idea they are presenting. I'd really like to understand what I am doing wrong before I move on. Can anyone help?

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1  
Search on google Multiline macros in C –  Grijesh Chauhan Oct 24 '13 at 16:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Macros are "one-liners".

A new-line ends the macro.

One needs to tell the pre-processor that the line-break in the editor should not be treated as one. This is done by ending the line with a back-slash (\).

So this

#define DefCell(EltType, CellType, ListType)
typedef struct CellType *ListType;
struct CellType {
  EltType element;
  ListType next; 
};

should be

#define DefCell(EltType, CellType, ListType) \
typedef struct CellType * ListType; \
struct CellType { \
  EltType element; \
  ListType next; \
};

Please note that to have this work nothing is allowed after the "line-terminating" back-slash.


And btw: DefCell isn't a variadic macro.

#define DefCell(E, C, L, ...) 

would be one.

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The macro and the comment below it don't match up.

#define DefCell(EltType, CellType, ListType)

says that the preprocessor should just remove every instance of DefCell(...).

If you want to define a macro over several lines, you need to include a backslash \ at the end of each intermediate line

#define DefCell(EltType, CellType, ListType) \
    typedef struct CellType *ListType;       \
    struct CellType {                        \
        EltType element;                     \
        ListType next;                       \
    };
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