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This is purely for self-interest and is not a homework assignment.

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
    char* str3;

    char* str1 = "Hello";
    char* str2 = "World!";

    while(*str1) str1++;
    while(*str1++ = *str2++);

    return 0;
}

I am attempting to develop a better understanding of C pointers and in doing so I would like to concatenate two strings and place the result into a third string. The (incomplete) code above results in a segfault and I'm not sure why. Isn't it possible to loop over the value referenced by a pointer and copy the data to another address?

Edit:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

int main(void)
{
    char* str1 = "Hello";
    char* str2 = "World!";

    char *str3 = malloc(strlen(str1) + strlen(str2) + 1);

    while(*str1) *str3++ = *str1++;
    while(*str2) *str3++ = *str2++;

    puts(str3);

    return 0;
}

The new attempt is above, and while not functional, are there "obvious" items I need to fix?

share|improve this question
1  
You seg-fault is from writing to read-only memory locations. You find the end of str1, then promptly start shoving chars from str2 at the location just-found. The two literals are likely in read-only memory and writing to them is a recipe for disaster. – WhozCraig Oct 24 '13 at 17:08
    
@CaitlinG: isn't type cast to (char*) is required with malloc(size + 1) ? – Vishnu Kanwar Oct 24 '13 at 18:23
    while(*str1) str1++;

This advances str1 until it points to the terminating zero byte at the end of the string constant.

    while(*str1 = *str2++);

This modifies the terminating zero byte at the end of the string, but the string is a constant and so can't be modified.

If you want to assemble a string in memory, you need to allocate some space to do that in or use functions that do so. You could do:

char *new_string = malloc(strlen(str1) + strlen(str2) + 1);
strcpy(new_string, str1);
strcat(new_string, str2);

The first line allocates enough space to hold str1's contents, str2's contents, and the terminating zero byte.

share|improve this answer
1  
@simonc I updated my answer to provide more details. Hopefully, that's less confusing. – David Schwartz Oct 24 '13 at 17:10
    
Thanks, much clearer now. +1 – simonc Oct 24 '13 at 17:11
    
Thanks for the help. I posted a new attempt (under edit). If anyone could point (pun intended) to the problems in the new post, I would be appreciative. While I think I've made some progress, some degree of confusion remains. For example, if I say *ptr, that refers to the data at the address referred to by ptr? *ptr++ moves though the memory address in accordance with the data type, e.g., 4 bytes for an int, etc? Thanks. – CaitlinG Oct 24 '13 at 17:34
    
@CaitlinG You need to save the original value you got from malloc so you can pass it to puts. – David Schwartz Oct 24 '13 at 18:10
  int main(void)
  {
      char* str1 = "Hello";
      char* str2 = "World!";
      // allocate one more byte for string terminate cher ('\n')
      int size = strlen(str1) + strlen(str2);
      char* str3 = (char*)malloc(size + 1);
      char* str_mod = str3;

      while( (*str_mod++ = *str1++) != '\0');
      str_mod--;
      while( (*str_mod++ = *str2++) != '\0');

      printf ( "%s", str3);
      free (str3);

      return 0;
  }
share|improve this answer
    
You fixed the previous problem but unfortunately when you call printf() the str3 pointer is past the end of the string and the free() call faults because the pointer is no longer that same as received from malloc()... – Blastfurnace Oct 24 '13 at 19:23

The constant strings are not modifyable. You are not modifying str3. You need to

  1. get the length of str1 and str2.
  2. malloc length of str1 + length str2 + 1 and assign to str3
  3. You can use while loops if you like for the copy, or you can use strcpy and strcat to copy the strings to str3.

Since you are trying to learn, I am trying not to write the code for you.

share|improve this answer
int main (void){
    char* str1 = "Hello";
    char* str2 = "World";

    int size1 = strlen(str1);
    int size2 = strlen(str2);
    int i = 0;

    char* out = malloc(sizeof(char)*(size1+size2)+1);

    for (i = 0; i < size1; i++){
        out[i] = str1[i];
    }
    for (i = 0; i < size2; i++){
        out[i+size1] = str2[i];
    }
    out[strlen(out)-1] = \0;
    //out is a string.
    //dont forget to free when you are done.  free(out);

}

Its been a few months since i did C, but this would work. my syntax might be slightly off.

share|improve this answer
2  
Don't free something you don't malloc! You also forgot the '\0' at the end of out. – Mathieu Mahé Oct 24 '13 at 17:16

2nd attempt in question misses putting string terminating null to end of str3. So puts reads beyond end of data, prints garbage and may even crash if there is no 0 byte before reading invalid address. Add *str3 ='\0'; after loops.

Additionally, you modify str3 and lose start of string. Add one more variable, keep the pointer returned by malloc, and pass that to puts. Current code will start printing at the end of the new string.

Then when you have pointers to string literals, make them pointers to const char, because usually string literals are in read only memory area:

const char* str1 = "Hello";
const char* str2 = "World!";
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