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Consider this snippet from AngularJS by Brad Green.

var directives = angular.module('guthub.directives', []);

directives.directive('butterbar', ['$rootScope',
    function ($rootScope) {
        return {
            link: function (scope, element, attrs) {
                element.addClass('hide');

                $rootScope.$on('$routeChangeStart', function () {
                    element.removeClass('hide');
                });

                $rootScope.$on('$routeChangeSuccess', function () {
                    element.addClass('hide');
                });
            }
        };
    }]
);

directives.directive('focus', function () {
    return {
        link: function (scope, element, attrs) {
            element[0].focus();
        }
    };
});

Notice that for the "butterbar" directive he passes in an array where the first item is just a string with the dependency name "$rootScope", and the second item is a function. That function declares a dependency on $rootScope. Why do we repeat ourselves here? Especially when it appears to be possible to just do this:

directives.directive('butterbar', function ($rootScope) {
    return {
        link: function (scope, element, attrs) {
            element.addClass('hide');

            $rootScope.$on('$routeChangeStart', function () {
                element.removeClass('hide');
            });

            $rootScope.$on('$routeChangeSuccess', function () {
                element.addClass('hide');
            });
        }
    };
});

I'm guessing that the dependency name being a string has some sort of significance. Can anyone tell me why they do this throughout the book (and not just for directives)?

share|improve this question
1  
Dependency injection vs minification. – elclanrs Oct 24 '13 at 17:47
    
Four words of clarity :) – Chev Oct 24 '13 at 17:47
up vote 13 down vote accepted

When JavaScript is minified, the names of parameters are often changed to something shorter such as a. This would break dependency injection.

If you use an array, Angular knows what to inject and where to inject it. This works with the array because the string elements of the array are not modified by minification.

In this example:

app.controller('test', function( $scope, $someProvider ) {
}); 

minified code might look something like this:

app.controller('test',function(a,b){}); 

This would no longer work since Angular will not know what to inject, whereas with this:

app.controller('test', ['$scope', '$someProvider', function( $scope, $someProvider) {
}]);

the minified code might end up like this:

app.controller('test',['$scope','$someProvider',function(a,b) {}]);

This would still work because Angular still knows what to inject. See the note on minification in the Angular tutorial.

Usually I just add the array style when I'm ready for production.

share|improve this answer
    
Awesome. Thanks for the explanation. Does that mean the order of the dependencies in the array must match the order of the arguments to the function? I imagine so, yes? – Chev Oct 24 '13 at 17:48
    
Yes it does. If you have them in the incorrect order the dependencies will be mismatched. – Jonathan Palumbo Oct 24 '13 at 17:49
    
Perfect. I will accept as soon as it lets me :) – Chev Oct 24 '13 at 17:49
    
One nice perk of this is that you can name the variables whatever you want in the function signature yourself. I know a lot of people despise the dollar sign variable names because they think they are JQuery wrapped sets at first. app.controller('test', ['$scope', function (scope) { ... }); I do think they should have gone with leading underscores or something to signify that they are internal dependencies being injected. – Chev Oct 24 '13 at 18:02
    
@AlexFord yes that is true, you can name them whatever you want. However i personally can't stand underscores in javascript, especially at the start of a variable, i can just about bare snake_case, but prefer camelCase. Whatever floats your boat. – iConnor Oct 24 '13 at 21:20

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