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I have the following program for books record

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#define SIZE 7
struct books{
        char name[100],author[100];
        int year,copies;
    };
struct books book1[SIZE],book2[SIZE],book3[SIZE],*list;
void union(struct books *,struct books *,struct books *,int);  

main()  
{  
 //code here  
}  

void union(struct books *list1,struct books *list2,struct books *list3,int n1,int n2)  
{  
 //code here  
}  

I'm getting the error at the function declaration as well as at defination as:

error: expected ‘{’ before ‘(’ token
error: two or more data types in declaration specifiers

What is wrong here?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You should not use union as function name. it is a reserved keyword in C

Check Keywords reserved by the C language

Reserved keywords meaning is already defined, and they cannot be re-defined to mean anything else. While naming your functions and variables, other than these names, you can choose names of reasonable length for variables, functions etc.

Edit

void union(struct books *,struct books *,struct books *,int);  //declaration

void union(struct books *list1,struct books *list2,struct books *list3,int n1,int n2)   //definition  
                                                                                ^^
{

} 

you have an extra parameter in definition modify either declaration or definition .

Also define main() with return type int.

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okay. I chage it to listunion now it's giving conflicting types for ‘listunion’. –  user2675010 Oct 24 '13 at 18:36
2  
See Shafik's answer. Your parameter lists for your declaration and definition don't match. –  godel9 Oct 24 '13 at 18:37
    
@xmpirate You have an extra parameter in definition modify accordingly –  Gangadhar Oct 24 '13 at 18:39
    
also I have just defined a single *list pointer to a structure. and in definition I have three pointers. is that wrong? –  user2675010 Oct 24 '13 at 18:43
    
@xmpirate No that is not wrong, you can pass list to three pointers and depending on your requirement you need to declare or define variables. –  Gangadhar Oct 24 '13 at 18:46

union is a reserved keyword in C. Try picking another function name.

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union is a reserved keyword in C so you can not use that name for a function. If we look at the draft C99 standard section 6.4.1 Keywords in paragraph 1 says:

keyword: one of

and includes union as part of the list and in paragraph 2 says:

The above tokens (case sensitive) are reserved (in translation phases 7 and 8) for use as keywords, and shall not be used otherwise.[...]

There are a few other issues as well, main needs to return int. The standard section 5.1.2.2.1 Program startup says(emphasis mine):

The function called at program startup is named main. The implementation declares no prototype for this function. It shall be defined with a return type of int[...]

and you declaration and definition of the function are different. The definition has one more int parameter:

void union(struct books *list1,struct books *list2,struct books *list3,
            int n1,int n2)  
                  ^^^^^^^
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also I have just defined a single *list pointer to a structure. and in definition I have three pointers. is that wrong? –  user2675010 Oct 24 '13 at 18:45
    
@xmpirate In functions - the parameter list in prototype has to match the parameter list in the definition –  ryyker Oct 24 '13 at 18:56
    
@ryyker I think the OP is talking about *list declaration above the function declaration but, but on a second read it is worded ambiguously. –  Shafik Yaghmour Oct 24 '13 at 18:59
    
@ShafikYaghmour yup you are right.If I want to pass the three array of structures book1[SIZE],book2[SIZE],book3[SIZE] to my listunion function I need 3 different pointers like *list1,*list2,*list3,right? That's what I'm asking about. –  user2675010 Oct 24 '13 at 19:02
    
@xmpirate not necessarily since array decay into pointers but without seeing more code it is hard to tell. This article Pointers to arrays in C covers a lot of ground and the C Faq section on arrays and pointers is great. –  Shafik Yaghmour Oct 24 '13 at 19:09

union is a reserved keyword in C. You may try to get some other name for your function

Also the return type of your main should be int

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Your definition of union is using , between the three members, and does not include variable names in each of the member declarations, and it is not correct to use void, as you are declaring a variable, not a function:

void union(struct books *,struct books *,struct books *,int);

It compiles if you use ; in place of ,, and include member names:

union {struct books *a;struct books *b;struct books *c;int d;} ;   

If, on the other hand, you are prototyping a function, then union is reserved in C, and cannot be used as a function name. Choose a different name, then you can use , separators, and do not have to use variable names in each argument, and you can return void:

void unionName(struct books *,struct books *,struct books *,int); //this is a legal function prototype.  

If it is a function prototype you are after, make sure the prototype matches the function definition below, currently it does not:

//prototype
union (struct books *,struct books *,struct books *,int d) ;   


//definition
void union(struct books *list1,struct books *list2,struct books *list3,int n1,int n2)
{  
  //some code
}  

Also, main() would be better written as:

int main(void)
{
//some code...  
return 0;
}
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First of all 'union' is a reserved keyword so change your function name. Secondly, as main is also a function from where execution of your program starts write void or int before main. If you declare void main then, do not return any value but if you choose int main then return any integer value at the end of your program.

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