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I have a test class like this. What I want to do is to keep running the three timers in this object. But after I instantiate an object, some timer just keeps repeating but others will disappear after like 3 mins. Can anyone explain this for me?

class EventProcessor
{
private:
    boost::asio::deadline_timer* m_Timer0;
    boost::asio::deadline_timer* m_Timer1;
    boost::asio::deadline_timer* m_Timer2;
    boost::asio::io_service io0;
    boost::asio::io_service io1;
    boost::asio::io_service io2;

    int TimerInterval[3];
    boost::asio::deadline_timer* Timers[3];
public:
    EventProcessor(int p_0, int p_1, int p_2)
    {   
        TimerInterval[0] = p_0;
        TimerInterval[1] = p_1;
        TimerInterval[2] = p_2;

        m_Timer0= new boost::asio::deadline_timer(io0, boost::posix_time::seconds(TimerInterval[0]));
        Timers[0] = m_Timer0;
        m_Timer1 = new boost::asio::deadline_timer(io1, boost::posix_time::seconds(TimerInterval[1]));
        Timers[1] = m_Timer1;
        m_Timer2 = new boost::asio::deadline_timer(io2, boost::posix_time::seconds(TimerInterval[2]));
        Timers[2] = m_Timer2;
        m_Timer0->async_wait(boost::bind(&EventProcessor::HandleExpire, this, boost::asio::placeholders::error, 0));
        m_Timer1->async_wait(boost::bind(&EventProcessor::HandleExpire, this, boost::asio::placeholders::error, 1));
        m_Timer2->async_wait(boost::bind(&EventProcessor::HandleExpire, this, boost::asio::placeholders::error, 2));
        StartWithNewThread(0);
        StartWithNewThread(1);
        StartWithNewThread(2);
    }


private:
    void HandleExpire(const boost::system::error_code& p_ec, int p_TimerIndex)
    {
        if(p_ec == boost::asio::error::operation_aborted)
        {
            std::cout << "Timer" << p_TimerIndex << " canceled" << std::endl;
            return;
        }
        std::cout << "Timer" << p_TimerIndex << " expired" << std::endl;
        //Reset(p_OriginalTimer, TimerInterval[p_TimerIndex], p_TimerIndex);
        boost::thread Thread(boost::bind(&EventProcessor::Reset, this, p_TimerIndex, TimerInterval[p_TimerIndex]));
    }

    void Start(int p_Index)
    {
        boost::asio::io_service& UnderlyingIO = Timers[p_Index]->get_io_service();
        UnderlyingIO.reset();
        UnderlyingIO.run();
        UnderlyingIO.stop();
        return;
    }

    void StartWithNewThread(int p_Index)
    {
        boost::thread Thread(boost::bind(&EventProcessor::Start, this, p_Index));
        std::cout << Thread.get_id() << "<->" << "Timer" << p_Index << std::endl;
        return;
    }

public:
    void Reset(int p_Index, int p_Seconds)
    {
        Timers[p_Index]->cancel();
        Timers[p_Index]->expires_from_now(boost::posix_time::time_duration(0,0,p_Seconds,0));
        TimerInterval[p_Index] = p_Seconds;
        Timers[p_Index]->async_wait(boost::bind(&EventProcessor::HandleExpire, this, boost::asio::placeholders::error, p_Index));
        boost::asio::io_service& UnderlyingIO = Timers[p_Index]->get_io_service();
        UnderlyingIO.reset();
        UnderlyingIO.run();
        UnderlyingIO.stop();
        return;
    }
};
share|improve this question
1  
Why does each timer have its own asio service? why do you launch a new thread for Reset (rather than just having a thread running the underlying IO service the whole time?) Calling reset after async_wait is weird (and possibly the source of your problem, since it could remove the work added by async_wait). –  MadScienceDreams Oct 24 '13 at 19:10
    
I was trying to use one io_service for three timer, but it seems doesnt work, cuz i will need to start them and reset them separately. –  cynric4sure Oct 24 '13 at 19:23
    
My understanding is the io.run() is actually when the timer starts to count down. So if i need to start timers at different moment, i need different io_service. Is that right? –  cynric4sure Oct 24 '13 at 19:25
1  
@cynric4sure: No, the timer period starts when the async_wait is called for the timer. Also you can have a single io_service handle several timers by giving the io_service to a boost::asio::io_service::work object and then putting the io_service::run method in a thread (or multiple threads). –  diverscuba23 Oct 24 '13 at 19:49
2  
Your understanding is a little incorrect. An io_service is a queue which processes objects as long as it has "work" to do. io_service::run is a blocking function that will process work in the queue as long as there is "work" to do. While you typically don't manage this manually, you can make a concrete instance of io_service::work which will keep run() going for the lifetime of the work object. However, with timer calls, you typically just call deadlock_timer::wait_async from the callback of the previous wait. This keeps work in the queue, and thus keeps run() blocking. –  MadScienceDreams Oct 24 '13 at 20:39

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

So this is how you should do it:

#include "test.h"
#include <boost/asio.hpp>
#include <boost/thread.hpp>
#include <boost/atomic.hpp>

class EventProcessor
{
private:
  std::unique_ptr<boost::asio::deadline_timer> m_Timers[3];

  boost::asio::io_service service;

  boost::atomic<int> TimerInterval[3];

public:
  EventProcessor(int time0,int time1, int time2)
  {   
    TimerInterval[0] = time0;
    TimerInterval[1] = time1;
    TimerInterval[2] = time2;

    for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++)
    {          
      m_Timers[i].reset(
        new boost::asio::deadline_timer(service));
    }
  }
  ~EventProcessor()
  {
    service.stop();
    for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++)
    {
      m_Timers[i]->cancel();
    }
  }
  void Run()
  {
    for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++)
    {
      m_Timers[i]->expires_from_now(boost::posix_time::seconds(TimerInterval[i]));
      m_Timers[i]->async_wait(boost::bind(&EventProcessor::HandleExpire,
        this,
        i,
        _1));
    }
    service.run();
  }
  void RunAsync()
  {
    boost::thread(boost::bind(&EventProcessor::Run,this));
  }
  void Reset(int i,int seconds)
  {
    TimerInterval[i] = seconds;

    m_Timers[i]->expires_from_now(boost::posix_time::seconds(TimerInterval[i]));
    m_Timers[i]->async_wait(boost::bind(&EventProcessor::HandleExpire,
      this,
      i,
      _1));
  }
private:
  void HandleExpire(int p_TimerIndex,  const boost::system::error_code& error)
  {
    if(error == boost::asio::error::operation_aborted)
    {
      std::cout << "Timer" << p_TimerIndex << " canceled" << std::endl;
      return;
    }
    std::cout << "Timer" << p_TimerIndex << " expired" << std::endl;
    //Reset(p_OriginalTimer, TimerInterval[p_TimerIndex], p_TimerIndex);

    m_Timers[p_TimerIndex]->expires_from_now(
      boost::posix_time::seconds(TimerInterval[p_TimerIndex]));
    m_Timers[p_TimerIndex]->async_wait(boost::bind(&EventProcessor::HandleExpire,
        this,
        p_TimerIndex,
        _1));
  }
};

int main()
{
  EventProcessor ev(1,2,3);
  ev.RunAsync();
  getchar();
  ev.Reset(2,4);
  getchar();
}

Granted I don't have any of the fancy checkers to see if you are currently running or not (which you totally need if you want this to be safe to use).

You can think of boost::asio::io_service as a context in which async calls can be made. It creates a FIFO queue of messages to process, and processes them where and when you tell it to. The most common way to process these messages is boost::asio::io_service::run, which will process messages until there is nothing left to be done. "nothing left to be done" is a flexible definition: it doesn't necessarily mean there is a message to process, just that there is stuff to be done. Things like a deadline timer make sure that there is "something to be done" as long as an async_wait is going on until the handler is called. You can manually enforce that there is something to be done by creating a boost::asio::io_service::work instance. This makes it so that there is "something left to be done" for the lifetime of the work object.

The deadline timer class takes care of all the async calls for you, so you don't have to spawn all those threads. The io_service performs synchronization, which is necessary to prevent annoying control issues.

So to the problem with your code:

With all those threads controlling the io_service, it is hard to tell what is actually going wrong...I have to guess on what could possibly going wrong. I'd put my money on somewhere along the line, you call a io_service::cancel before a deadline timer times out, which will stop your loop. I solve this in my code by doing all the control (calling wait_async) in one synchronous thread (the io_service::run call) and only calling io_service::cancel when I want the code to stop.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. Just tried this idea. It works fine –  cynric4sure Oct 24 '13 at 21:25
    
One more question. It seems this object cant be distructed properly. –  cynric4sure Oct 25 '13 at 13:43
    
I cancel all the timers and then call io.stop() in my distructor, it doesnt work. It seems that io.run() never returns even I called io.stop() in my distructor. –  cynric4sure Oct 25 '13 at 13:44
    
this would be a better answer if you can explain why the OP's original solution does not work, and what is different about yours. –  Sam Miller Oct 25 '13 at 15:47
    
@cynric4sure not sure why you are getting a problem, I'll add a custom destructor to the class that I used without problem, then address SamMiller's comment –  MadScienceDreams Oct 25 '13 at 16:45

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