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my @flavors = qw/sweet,sour cherry/;

yields "Possible attempt to separate words with commas" - how can I disable that warning in cases where I want literal commas?

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4 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Disable the warnings locally:

{
    no warnings 'qw';
    my @flavors = qw/sweet,sour cherry/;
}

UPDATE: Or, separate out those with commas:

my @flavors = ('sweet,sour', qw/cherry apple berry/);
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I like it, but I wish there were a way to let in the comma without disabling all warnings relating to qw. Or maybe to just allow that one comma, but not others... –  gcbenison Oct 24 '13 at 18:44
    
Maybe create 2 arrays: 1 with commas, the other without. –  toolic Oct 24 '13 at 18:47
3  
At this point, wouldn't it be easier to just not use qw? –  friedo Oct 24 '13 at 18:54
    
See my updated Answer. –  toolic Oct 24 '13 at 19:06
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Just don't use qw// but one of the plenty other quoting operators, paired with a split. How does q// sound?

my @flavours = split ' ', q/sweet,sour cherry/;

The qw// is just a helpful shortcut, but it's never necessary to use it.

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You could use no warnings 'qw';.

my @x = do {
   no warnings qw( qw );
   qw(
      a,b
      c
      d
   )
};

Unfortunately, that also disables warnings for #. You could have # mark a comment to remove the need for that warning.

use syntax qw( qw_comments );

my @x = do {
   no warnings qw( qw );
   qw(
      a,b
      c
      d   # e
   )
};

But it's rather silly to disable that warning. It's easier just to avoid it.

my @x = (
   'a,b',
   'c',
   'd',   # e
);

or

my @x = (
   'a,b',
   qw( c d ),  # e
);
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In a case where I was developing a framework where lists of comma separated keywords was pretty commonplace, I chose to surgically suppress those warnings at the signal handler.

$SIG{__WARN__} = sub {
    return 
        if $_[0] =~ m{ separate words with commas };
    return CORE::warn @_;
};
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