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I am writing a clojure recursion function so that given:

(luty [1 2 3 4])

should have output like this:

((1 2 3 4) (2 3 4) (3 4) (4) ()

My code is:

(defn luty [a1]
 (if (empty? a1)
   (list )
     (cons (seq a1)  (luty (rest a1) )
  )))

I am getting output:

((1 2 3 4) (2 3 4) (3 4) (4)) //comment missing a ()

Can anybody suggest me where I am getting wrong?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If we print out the process and look at the second to last opperation:

user> (defn luty [a1]
        (println "a1 is" a1)
         (if (empty? a1)
             ()
           (cons (seq a1) (luty (rest a1)))))
#'user/luty
user> (luty [1 2 3 4])
a1 is [1 2 3 4]
a1 is (2 3 4)
a1 is (3 4)
a1 is (4)
a1 is ()
((1 2 3 4) (2 3 4) (3 4) (4))
user> (cons '(4) ())
((4))

We can see that the result of adding (4) to the empty list is ((4)) rather than ((4) ()) as you would most likely want. This can be fixed by making the base case a list containing the empty list, instead of just an empty list

user> (defn luty [a1]
         (if (empty? a1)
           '(())
           (cons (seq a1) (luty (rest a1)))))
#'user/luty
user> (luty [1 2 3 4])
((1 2 3 4) (2 3 4) (3 4) (4) ())
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The return value of cons is a list with as the first element the first argument and the rest of the list as the second argument. If the second argument is empty or nil, that means you get a list with the first argument as the single member.

The reason for this is that lists are (conceptually, at least, in clojure) linked lists with 2-space cells; one pointer for the head element and one pointer for the tail (another list, which in clojure is guaranteed to be a seq-like thing - in many other lisps you can set the second pointer to any value you want, so you're not guaranteed to get a "proper" list out of a cons there). A nil in the "tail" position marks the end of the list.

Lists are the most easily implemented and understandable persistent (in the clojure sense of immutable, structure-sharing) data structure.

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Just to give you a different way of looking at it:

user> (defn luty [a1]
        (reductions (fn [c _] (rest c)) (or (seq a1) '()) (-> a1 count range)))
   => #'user/luty
user> (luty [1 2 3 4])
   => ((1 2 3 4) (2 3 4) (3 4) (4) ())
user> (luty [])
   => (())
user> (luty nil)
   => (())
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