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public static boolean sameNumbers(int number) {
    boolean isSame;
    isSame = (number % 10) == (number / 10) % 10;      
    sameNumbers(number / 10);
    return isSame;
}

My task is to implement a method which checks if the given int value has all the same numbers (e.g. 666 or 1111). However, the requirement is that I should just choose recursion and no iteration.

I am aware that my method wouldn't work, but I really don't know how I can solve this problem without any if statements. Any ideas?

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5  
An if-statement is not an iteration. –  Jeroen Vannevel Oct 24 '13 at 18:50
1  
But you can use an If statement, no? It's just iteration you can't? –  asantaballa Oct 24 '13 at 18:50
    
@OscarRyz Not necessarily, see my answer. –  Zong Zheng Li Oct 24 '13 at 18:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You have the right approach. It's just a matter of combining the base case with the recursive component. If you want to avoid if, just do this:

public static boolean sameNumbers(int number) {
    return number < 10 || ((number % 10) == (number / 10) % 10) 
                          && sameNumbers(number / 10));
}
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He is confusing with if vs iteration, this solution is nice though –  OscarRyz Oct 24 '13 at 18:54
    
Bravo!! Cheers.. –  Nizam Oct 24 '13 at 18:55
    
thanks! I just couldnt find such a efficient solution! Well, I mean nothing is allowed but recursion like this, sorry I know if is not an iteration. –  Dennis von Eich Oct 24 '13 at 19:15
    
@zong What should sameNumber(-23) return? –  allonhadaya Oct 24 '13 at 19:54
1  
@allonhadaya Yes, that's a better base case. I opted to just deal with position values but thinking about it, it doesn't matter in this case. Though in general modulo and integer division on negative numbers can produce some subtle issues, which is why I was wary. –  Zong Zheng Li Oct 25 '13 at 14:57

When tackling a recursion problem, you have to split it into a base case and a recurse case. So for instance, you know that any number with one digit contains all the same digit. That would be your base case.

For numbers with more than one digit, you could check two digits, and fail fast if they don't match. If they do match, then chop one off and return the test against the shortened number.

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Thanks, good explanation –  Dennis von Eich Oct 24 '13 at 19:41

For a more spelled out implementation:

public static bool sameNumbers(int number) {
    int onesPlace = number % 10;
    int shifted = number / 10;
    int tensPlace = shifted % 10;
    return onesPlace == number || (onesPlace == tensPlace && sameNumbers(shifted));
}

Depending on your definition of correct, this will handle negative numbers correctly.


If you are allowed to use if statements, this will save you a few instructions:

public static bool sameNumbers(int number) {
    int onesPlace = number % 10;
    if (onesPlace == number) {
        return true;
    }
    int shifted = number / 10;
    int tensPlace = shifted % 10;
    return onesPlace == tensPlace && sameNumbers(shifted);
}
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