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Having the following piece of code:


File: types.h

typedef struct Struct_A_T
{
   int   A;
   char  B;
   float C;
}Struct_A;

File: code.c

#include "types.h"

void Function(const void *const ptr)
{
   Struct_A localStruct = *((Struct_A *)ptr);

   localStruct.A = 1000;
   localStruct.B = 250;
   localStruct.C = 128.485;
}

File: main.c

#include "types.h"

void Function(const void *const ptr);

int main(void)
{
   Struct_A MyStruct1 = {2, 5, 2.8};
   float local = 24.785;

   /* Correct call */
   Function(&MyStruct1);

   /* Incorrect call!!! */
   Function(&local);
}

And knowing that a pointer to void can be used as a "generic" pointer. How can I detect inside "Function" that the type passed in the void pointer is the correct in order to avoid the run time error provoked by the last call in the file main.c?

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Void pointers and type safety are mutually exclusive concepts. You can't have both, at least not in C. –  John Bode Oct 24 '13 at 19:15

3 Answers 3

There's no way to do it using language features. It can only be done manually.

I, for one, use the following technique in debug builds of the code

typedef struct Struct_A_T
{
   int   A;
   char  B;
   float C;
#ifdef DEBUG
   unsigned signature; 
#endif /* DEBUG */
}Struct_A;

i.e. in debug configuration I introduce an additional field into the structure. Each object of that struct type has to have that field initialized with some pre-determined "unpredictable" signature value specific for this type, like

#define STRUCT_A_SIGNATURE 0x12345678

which is easy to do if all structures are created in some centralized fashion (like allocated dynamically or initialized by a dedicated function). This might be more cumbersome if there's no such centralized location. But that the price we sometimes have to pay for safety. For example, in your example case that would be

Struct_A MyStruct1 = {2, 5, 2.8, 0x12345678 };

BTW, designated initializers might make such initializations more stable and it easier to read.

And then, in order to convert pointers from void * to the specific type I use the following cast macro

#ifdef DEBUG
  #define TO_STRUCT_A(p)\
    (assert((p) == NULL || ((Struct_A *)(p))->signature == STRUCT_A_SIGNATURE),\
      (Struct_A *)(p))
#else /* DEBUG */
  #define TO_STRUCT_A(p) ((Struct_A *)(p))
#endif /* DEBUG */

meaning that inside your Function you'd do

Struct_A localStruct = *TO_STRUCT_A(ptr);

which with very high probability will trigger assertion failure if a pointer to wrong type is passed to Function.

This all can (and should) be implemented using a more generic set of macros, of course.

Obviously, this only works for struct types, into which you can inject that additional signature field. Another potential problem with this approach is that by introducing an extra field into the structure in debug builds one can potentially cause the behavior of debug and release build to diverge.

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You can't, that's the primary downside of void*, you have no way to determine what is being pointed to. You just have to know.

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You may use sizeof to compare sizes of the struct to that which void* points points to. This is not a sufficient but necessary condition that a pointer to your struct type is passed to Function. BTW the property of languages with the possibility to check metadata (incl. types) of variables and wider is called reflection. It is available in many modern languages and some bits have been included recently in C++11, but C still lacks it.

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1  
eh? How do you find the sizeof something to which void* points to? AFAIK, there is no way with a pointer to know the size of whatever it's pointing at... –  Nim Oct 24 '13 at 19:11
    
@Nim Good point. –  Igor Popov Oct 24 '13 at 19:12
    
sizeof cannot be applied to void type, meaning that it cannot be applied to a dereferenced void * pointer. In any case, outside of VLA contexts sizeof is a purely compile-time operator, which for that reason cannot possibly be used to verify any run-time conditions. –  AndreyT Oct 24 '13 at 19:26

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