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I have this solution for SICP code in Lisp:

 ;; ex 1.11. Iterative implementation 

 (define (f n) 
   (define (iter a b c count) 
     (if (= count 0) 
       a 
       (iter b c (+ c (* 2 b) (* 3 a)) (- count 1)))) 
   (iter 0 1 2 n)) 

I don't really know how Lisp works; I understand a few thing here, but it's still hard for me to translate it to Python. For example, I don't know why a is written below if. How could this code be translated to Python or C++? (the function have to be iterative and not recursive)

share|improve this question
    
In the future, please do at least a little research on your questions before asking. The second result from Google when searching for sicp python translation is SICP Translation - Python Code - Chapter #1. That doesn't include an explanation of the code, so I've still posted an answer below, but if you can already read Python, you should be able to use the Python code to figure out what the Lisp code is doing. – Joshua Taylor Oct 24 '13 at 20:21
    
You might also want to take a look at Materials for SICP with python?. – Joshua Taylor Oct 24 '13 at 20:22
up vote 4 down vote accepted

There are two ways to think about the translation. One would be to write a literal, straight translation without respecting Python's idioms and conventions - it will look like this:

def f(n):
    def iter(a, b, c, count):
        if count == 0:
            return a
        else:
            return iter(b, c, 2*b + 3*a + c, count-1)
    return iter(0, 1, 2, n)

The other way is to write the code in a Pythonic fashion such that it respects the target language's conventions and makes use of its iteration mechanisms:

def f(n):
    a, b, c = 0, 1, 2
    for count in range(n):
        a, b, c = b, c, 2*b + 3*a + c
    return a

By the way, the second version will be faster, and won't have a problem with an stack overflow error (Python is not optimized for recursion!). It's irrelevant that in the recursive version count goes from n to 0 and in the loop version count goes from 0 to n, because anyway the value of count is not being used for anything besides iterating a given number of times.

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Let's take a look at that code:

;; ex 1.11. Iterative implementation 

(define (f n) 
  (define (iter a b c count) 
    (if (= count 0) 
      a 
      (iter b c (+ c (* 2 b) (* 3 a)) (- count 1)))) 
  (iter 0 1 2 n)) 

The first thing to note here is that two functions are being defined. One is f, and the other is iter. iter is a helper function, and is intended to be used only by f (since it's defined inside of f. There's no reason that you can't actually separate the two definitions, though, into:

(define (iter a b c count) 
  (if (= count 0) 
    a 
    (iter b c (+ c (* 2 b) (* 3 a)) (- count 1))))

(define (f n) 
  (iter 0 1 2 n)) 

In Lisps, the syntax (frob bar1 bar2 ...) means that you're calling the function frob with arguments bar1, bar2, .... So the definition of f

(define (f n) 
  (iter 0 1 2 n)) 

should be relatively clear. You're defining a function f that takes a single argument n, and then you're calling the function iter with four arguments, 0, 1, 2, and n. So what does iter do?

(define (iter a b c count) 
  (if (= count 0) 
    a 
    (iter b c (+ c (* 2 b) (* 3 a)) (- count 1))))

iter takes four arguments. First, it checks whether count is 0. If it is, then iter returns a. Otherwise, iter calls itself recursively with b, c. (+ c (* 2 b) (* 3 a)) and (- count 1) and value that the recursive call returns is returned. Base on the description of Lisp syntax above, you should be able to tell that (+ c (* 2 b) (* 3 a)) is just the mathematical expression c + 2b + 3a, and that (- count 1) is just count-1.

The trickiest part about all of this, I suppose, is knowing that if takes three arguments: the first is the test expression; the second is the "then" part, also called the consequent; and the third is the "else" part, also called the alternative. Unlike some other languages where if is just used to conditionally execute some statements, (if ...) returns a value in Lisp, and the value is either the value of the the consequent or the value of the alternative, depending on whether the value of the test was true or false.

With this description, you should be able to write up a counterpart in any programming language that you are familiar with.

Of course, once you understand all that, you might do well to read some of Chris Rathman's translation of SICP code into Python, which includes a translation of this the code from Exercise 1.11:

# Exercise 1.11
def f(n):
   if n < 3:
      return n
   else:
      return f(n-1) + 2*f(n-2) + 3*f(n-3)
def f_iter(a, b, c, count):
   if count == 0:
      return c
   else:
      return f_iter(a + 2*b + 3*c, a, b, count-1)
def f(n):
   return f_iter(2, 1, 0, n)
share|improve this answer

Here is basically how iter looks like in C

int iter (int a, int b, int c, int count)
{
    if( count == 0 )
       return a;
    else
       return iter(b, c, c + (2 * b) + (3 * a), count - 1);
}

Every expression in Scheme evaluates to a value thus it's implicit return. The if returns whatever the branch is run and iter return whatever the if returns and so on.

Without knowing for sure this looks like a recursive sequence that refer to the 3 previous numbers to calculate the next that has been made iterated to constant stack in Scheme. Be aware that Python wont tail call optimize this and C++ and C probably needs special compiler options and a capable compiler to do it.

share|improve this answer
    
or a while-based explicit loop re-write. :) – Will Ness Oct 24 '13 at 20:45

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