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After about the 5th time today that I did for /? and spaced through all of the screens to get to the bottom for the substitution reference I decided to come up with a way to get just it quick and easy. After awhile, I came up with:

for /? | more +118 

I dumped that into a batch file and called it optparams.cmd and it does exactly what I want. Now, I want to do the same thing with SET but only listing the section on environment variable substitution. I could do the MORE trick again but then I'd have to scroll through the rest of the screens when I'm done.

My question is: What would be the easiest way to only display a section of STDOUT given a starting and ending parameter? Line numbers or certain text strings would be best. I'm thinking reading it all into an array would be the way to start but I'm still trying to get my head around arrays in batch right now. Any insight or tips appreciated.

Edit: I turned MC ND's post into the following function which does basically what I want.

    call :ExtractBetween 68 96 "set /?"
    exit /b


    :ExtractBetween start stop cmd
    @echo off & setlocal
    set _start=%1 & set _end=%2 & set _cmd=%~3
    for /F "tokens=1,* delims=:" %%f in (
    '%_cmd% ^| findstr /n /r "." ') do (
        if %%f geq %_start% if %%f leq %_end% (
            echo %%g)
    ) 
    exit /b
share|improve this question
    
Avoid the issue, and rather than scroll through the rest of the screens, just hit CTRL-C (or Q for that matter)? ;-) –  Scott Mermelstein Oct 24 '13 at 20:02
    
the easiest way is to take sed for this. –  Endoro Oct 24 '13 at 20:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The Batch file below extract a range of lines: from first occurence of first string to last occurence of second string, or a number of lines:

@echo off
setlocal DisableDelayedExpansion

if "%~3" neq "" goto start
echo Show a range of lines, from "start string" to "end string" or number of lines
echo/
echo ShowRange.bat inputfile "start string" "end string"
echo ShowRange.bat inputfile "start string" /N:24
goto :EOF

:start
set end=%~3
if /I "%end:~0,3%" neq "/N:" (
   for /F "delims=:" %%a in ('findstr /N /C:%2 /C:%3 %1') do (
      if not defined start (
         set /A start=%%a-1
      ) else (
         set end=%%a
      )
   )
   set /A lines=end-start
) else (
   for /F "delims=:" %%a in ('findstr /N /C:%2 %1') do (
      if not defined start set /A start=%%a-1
   )
   set lines=%end:~3%
)

if %start% neq 0 set skip=skip=%start%
for /F "%skip% delims=" %%a in ('findstr /N "^" %1') do (
   set "line=%%a"
   setlocal EnableDelayedExpansion
   set "line=!line:*:=!"
   echo(!line!
   set /A lines-=1
   if "!lines!" equ "0" goto :EOF
   for /F %%b in ("!lines!") do endlocal & set lines=%%b
)

For example:

set /? > set.txt
ShowRange.bat set.txt "Environment variable substitution" "would extract"
ShowRange.bat set.txt "Environment variable substitution" /N:24

EDIT: The version below read the input from STDIN so it can be used with a pipe, but it is slower because it must achieve the "find string" part with each input line:

@echo off
setlocal DisableDelayedExpansion

if "%~2" neq "" goto start
echo Show a range of lines, from "start string" to "end string" or number of lines
echo/
echo command ^| ShowRangePipe.bat "start string" "end string"
echo command ^| ShowRangePipe.bat "start string" /N:24
goto :EOF

:start
set startFound=no
set end=%~2
if /I "%end:~0,3%" neq "/N:" (
   for /F "delims=" %%a in ('findstr /N "^"') do (
      set "line=%%a"
      setlocal EnableDelayedExpansion
      set "line=!line:*:=!"
      if "!startFound!" equ "no" (
         if defined line if "!line:%~1=!" neq "!line!" set startFound=yes & echo !line!
      ) else (
         echo(!line!
         if defined line if "!line:%~2=!" neq "!line!" goto :EOF
      )
      for /F %%b in ("!startFound!") do endlocal & set startFound=%%b
   )
) else (
   set /A lines=%end:~3%-1
   for /F "delims=" %%a in ('findstr /N "^"') do (
      set "line=%%a"
      setlocal EnableDelayedExpansion
      set "line=!line:*:=!"
      if "!startFound!" equ "no" (
         if defined line if "!line:%~1=!" neq "!line!" set startFound=yes & echo !line!
      ) else (
         echo(!line!
         set /A lines-=1
         if "!lines!" equ "0" goto :EOF
      )
      for /F "tokens=1,2" %%b in ("!startFound! !lines!") do endlocal & set "startFound=%%b" & set lines=%%c
   )
)

For example:

set /? | ShowRangePipe.bat "Environment variable substitution" "would extract"
set /? | ShowRangePipe.bat "Environment variable substitution" /N:24
share|improve this answer
    
Very good but can you do it without writing to the text file first? ;) –  Matt Williamson Oct 25 '13 at 11:57
    
Yes, but in this case the program is slower because it must search for the strings in each line. I added such version above... –  Aacini Oct 25 '13 at 16:33

Numerate lines with findstr, and filter between line numbers

@echo off
    setlocal enableextensions
    set _start=%1
    set _end=%2
    for /F "tokens=1,* delims=:" %%f in ('for /? ^| findstr /n /r "." ') do (
        if %%f geq %_start% if %%f leq %_end% (
            echo %%g
        )
    )
share|improve this answer

example with sed for Windows and range addresses:

>set /? | sed "/Environment variable substitution/,+24!d
Environment variable substitution has been enhanced as follows:

    %PATH:str1=str2%

would expand the PATH environment variable, substituting each occurrence
of "str1" in the expanded result with "str2".  "str2" can be the empty
string to effectively delete all occurrences of "str1" from the expanded
output.  "str1" can begin with an asterisk, in which case it will match
everything from the beginning of the expanded output to the first
occurrence of the remaining portion of str1.

May also specify substrings for an expansion.

    %PATH:~10,5%

would expand the PATH environment variable, and then use only the 5
characters that begin at the 11th (offset 10) character of the expanded
result.  If the length is not specified, then it defaults to the
remainder of the variable value.  If either number (offset or length) is
negative, then the number used is the length of the environment variable
value added to the offset or length specified.

    %PATH:~-10%

would extract the last 10 characters of the PATH variable.

>set /? | sed "/Environment variable substitution/,/would extract/!d
Environment variable substitution has been enhanced as follows:

    %PATH:str1=str2%

would expand the PATH environment variable, substituting each occurrence
of "str1" in the expanded result with "str2".  "str2" can be the empty
string to effectively delete all occurrences of "str1" from the expanded
output.  "str1" can begin with an asterisk, in which case it will match
everything from the beginning of the expanded output to the first
occurrence of the remaining portion of str1.

May also specify substrings for an expansion.

    %PATH:~10,5%

would expand the PATH environment variable, and then use only the 5
characters that begin at the 11th (offset 10) character of the expanded
result.  If the length is not specified, then it defaults to the
remainder of the variable value.  If either number (offset or length) is
negative, then the number used is the length of the environment variable
value added to the offset or length specified.

    %PATH:~-10%

would extract the last 10 characters of the PATH variable.
share|improve this answer

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