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I've been given a design for a website, and am trying to implement it.

One problem I've run into is that the design has some background images (one for the header, one for the body, and one for the footer of the site) that are wider than the main content area of the site.

Simply putting them in as background images doesn't work, since expanding the header, body and footer divs enough to accommodate the backgrounds causes horizontal scrollbars to appear if the browser window is not big enough to fully show the backgrounds.

This is undesirable since the backgrounds are not really important for viewing the website, and I don't want scrollbars to appear for them (scrollbars should only appear once the browser is too small to completely show the content of the website).

The second technique is to have a separate, absolutely positioned div to show the header background image (and put it under an element with the browser window's size), and set its width to 100% so that it never exceeds the size of the browser window (and hence create scrollbars).

This works up to a point - however, when the window is too small, the background starts shifting around relative to the content since the "top center" position of the background is relative to the browser window, not the content area. At large sizes, these are effectively the same since the content area is centered, but at small sizes, only part of the content is shown, so the center of the content and the center of the browser window are different.

A good illustration of this problem that I've found is the Quicken website: http://quicken.intuit.com/. At large sizes, its cloud background looks fine, but if you make your window's width small enough, the clouds start shifting relative to the content (bad!).

Any ideas on how to fix this so that backgrounds images

  1. don't create scrollbars since they are not part of the content of the site
  2. are fixed relative to the content of the site (and don't shift around at small browser window sizes)

?

An ideal solution would be something like turning overflow to hidden on the body, but only for specified divs. Unfortunately I believe this is impossible.

I'd prefer a pure html/css solution, but I accept that I may need js to get the effect I want.

Thanks! (this is a complex issue, so if any clarification is needed, let me know)

UPDATE: Fixed this by setting min-width on the background div to the width of the content.

share|improve this question
1  
Fixed this by setting min-width on the background div to the width of the content. – Jeremy Sharpe Dec 24 '09 at 10:04
    
Your requriements seem to contradict each other. Does the header need to expand so that the background image is fully visible - i.e. all pixels are shown - or should the header size be dictated by its other content? – belugabob Dec 24 '09 at 10:08
    
All pixels of the background need to be shown at all times, yes. – Jeremy Sharpe Dec 24 '09 at 11:07
    
(To clarify above, not necessarily within the viewable window though. They just shouldn't be dependent on content.) – Jeremy Sharpe Dec 24 '09 at 11:08
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Set the min-width on the div containing the background image to the width of the content.

share|improve this answer

You need to have your header, content & footer have a width of 100%. And put the image in as a background image in these divs ... center it horizontally.

Inside the specific divs have a wrapper that is centered. and is the width of the content of them divs.

Like so.

HTML

<div id="header">
    <div class="wrapper">
        ...
    </div>
</div>
<div id="content">
    <div class="wrapper">
        ...
    </div>
</div>
<div id="footer">
    <div class="wrapper">
        ...
    </div>
</div>

CSS

div#header {
    background: url(...) 50% 0; /* to center your background image horizontally */
    }

div#content {
    background: url(...) 50% 0; /* to center your background image horizontally */
    }

div#footer {
    background: url(...) 50% 0; /* to center your background image horizontally */
    }

div.wrapper {
    margin: 0 auto; /* to center the div horizontally */
    width: 960px; /* or however wide it should be */
    }

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
I think this might work - I'll give it a try. Thanks. :) I also managed to solve it by setting a min-width on the divs containing the background images. – Jeremy Sharpe Dec 24 '09 at 10:05
    
Actually, this method does not work. It is almost exactly what Quicken does, and hence suffers from the same, background shifting at small horizontal sizes problem. – Jeremy Sharpe Dec 24 '09 at 10:07
1  
Actually this method does work. It's just missing min-width: 960px; on either the html or body elements. – Eden Townsend Jan 4 '13 at 12:32

Am I missing something, or should you be using the CSS background-image property?

I had a look at the Quicken site, and to be honest the cloud background image shifting when the browser is resized shouldn't be worried about unless your background-image is most distinctive than a bunch of clouds.

See what I mean?

share|improve this answer
    
The background I am using is a bit more distinctive, and it's important that it lines up with the content in front. (I am using the background-image property, just as the Quicken site is using). – Jeremy Sharpe Dec 24 '09 at 10:02
    
Right ok, it wasn't obvious from your post :-) – Ben Everard Dec 24 '09 at 10:25
    
"This is undesirable since the backgrounds are not really important for viewing the website" or "and it's important that it lines up with the content in front" - which is it? – belugabob Dec 24 '09 at 10:42
    
To clarify, the centers of the backgrounds are important, but the left and right edges that are outside the content are are not, and are certainly not important enough to need to be able to scroll to. – Jeremy Sharpe Dec 24 '09 at 11:07

You could use the overflow property and set it to hidden on the div that cause a scrollbars to appear.

share|improve this answer
    
The problem is the div that the scrollbars appear on is the body, which I DO want scrollbars to appear on sometimes. – Jeremy Sharpe Dec 24 '09 at 10:01

I had the same issue on a site that I worked on, and come up with the following solution, which works well if all your background images are the same width.

/* 
A container div that is set to the 100% width, with the overflow set to hidden. 
This hides the overflowing images if the window sizes is too small 
*/

#bg_container {
    position:absolute;
    z-index:0;
    top:0px;
    width:100%;
    overflow:hidden;
}

/* 
A div that sets the size of the content and centers itself on the page. 
*/

.bg {
    margin:0 auto;
    width:1000px;  /* content size */
    overflow:visible;
}

/* 
Here I set the image away from the left edge of the div to center it to the content. The actual size of the image is 1500px. 
*/

.bg img {
    margin-left:-250px;
}
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