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When I call my 2nd class one of my int values goes to a random number. I know its because its acting like it is undefined, but I don't know how it becomes undefined all of a sudden. I checked the value before it goes around to the second list, and it's fine and I couldn't find anything that makes it change.

Main.cpp

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include "cqueue.h"
using namespace std;

enum choice { BOOKED, WAITING };
const int LINES = 2;

int showMenu(void);
void addPassenger(CQueue* cque);
void deletePassenger(CQueue* cque);
void showPassengers(CQueue* cque);

int main (void){
    CQueue qPassengers[LINES];
    int x;
    do{
        x = showMenu();
        switch (x)
        {
            case 1: addPassenger(qPassengers);
            break;
            case 2: deletePassenger(qPassengers);
            break;
            case 3: showPassengers(qPassengers);
            break;
        }
    } while (x != 4);
    return 0;
}//main

int showMenu(void){

    int select;

    cout << "Menu\n";
    cout << "========\n";
    cout << "1. Add Passenger\n";
    cout << "2. Delete Passenger\n";
    cout << "3. Show Passengers\n";
    cout << "4. Exit\n";
    cout << "Enter choice: ";
    cin >> select;
    return select;
}//showMenu


void addPassenger(CQueue* cque){
    Passenger pass;
    if( cque[1].IsFull() == 0){
        cout<<"Insert Name."<<endl;
        cin>>pass.name;
        cout<<"Adding "<<pass.name<<" to the flight."<<endl;
        cque[1].Enqueue(pass);
    }else{
        if( cque[2].IsFull() == 0){
            cout<<"Insert Name."<<endl;
            cin>>pass.name;
            cout<<"Sorry, the flight is full adding "<<pass.name<<" to the              waiting list."<<endl;
            cque[2].Enqueue(pass);
        }else{
            cout<<"Both the flight and the waiting list are full."<<endl;
        }
    }
}//addPassenger

void deletePassenger(CQueue*){
}

void showPassengers(CQueue* cque){  
}

CQueue.cpp

#include "cqueue.h"
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

CQueue::CQueue(){
    rear = MAX - 1;
    front = MAX - 1;
    cout<<front;
    cout<<"Toodaloo"<<endl;
}

void CQueue::Enqueue(Passenger pass){
        if (IsFull() == 1){
            cout<<"The Que is full."<<endl;
        }else{
            rear =  (rear + 1) % MAX;
            passengers[rear] = pass;
            cout<<"front: "<<front<<endl<<endl;
    }
}//Enqueue

void CQueue::Dequeue(){
    if(IsEmpty() == 1){
        cout<<"The que is empty."<<endl;
    }else{
        front = (front + 1) % MAX;
    }
}//Dequeue

bool CQueue::IsEmpty(){
    if (front == rear)
        return 1;
    return 0;
}//Empty

bool CQueue::IsFull(){
    if ( front == ((rear + 1) % MAX) )
        return 1;
    return 0;
}//Full

Passenger CQueue::Front(){
    return passengers[front];
}//Front

cqueue.h:

const int MAX = 4; 

struct Passenger {
    char name[80];
};

class CQueue {
private:
    int front;
    int rear;
    Passenger passengers[MAX];

public:
    CQueue();
    bool IsEmpty(void);
    bool IsFull(void);
    void Enqueue(Passenger pass);
    Passenger Front(void);
    void Dequeue(void); 
};
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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It's hard to give a proper answer without seeing the output, but the thing I notice is this:

Your front pointer should point to a valid slot (unless the list is empty), and rear should point to the next available (unused) slot. However, when you enqueue you do this:

        rear =  (rear + 1) % MAX;
        passengers[rear] = pass;

That is, rear points to the last used slot, and in an empty list, front will then point to an unavailable slot. When you call the Front method the first time, you will see an uninitialised value. I presume that you are asking for Front before you call Dequeue. That would be the normal way.

So I suggest you swap the order of those two lines of code, and it should work as expected.

Your IsFull and IsEmpty functions look fine. You've done it correctly, in that you cannot use all the slots - you must reserve one so you can distinguish between an empty and a full list.

One thing that bugs me is you compare bool values to 1. Please don't! Here's what you do:

if( IsEmpty() == 1 )

The bool type is not the same as int. Your compiler should be warning you about this. Just do this:

if( IsEmpty() )
share|improve this answer
    
Oh man, Thank you! I got it. –  Lou George Oct 24 '13 at 23:54

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