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Assume that I have a library which defines an interface:

namespace LibraryOne
{
   public interface ISomething
   {
       void DoSomething();
   }
}

I implement this in a second library

namespace LibraryTwo
{
   public class Something : ISomething
   {
       public void DoSomething() { throw new Exception("I don't know how to do anything!"); }
   }
}

I then use this class in a third library

namespace LibraryThree
{
   public class MyClass
   {
      private Something myThing = new Something();
      public void DoIt() { 
          myThing.DoSomething();
      }
   }
}

Visual Studio tells me that LibraryThree has to have a reference to LibraryOne for this code to work. Even if I make ISomething internal and make LibraryOne InternalsVisibleTo LibraryTwo, I still have to have that reference. Why?

If I actually referred to an ISomething, I'd understand. If I expected Something to behave like an ISomething, I'd understand. But I just need to treat it as a Something.

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

I just need to treat it as a Something

That's the thing: the moment you implement ISomething in Something, it becomes an ISomething too. The fact that a class implements an interface is integral to that classes nature.

Without this, you would be able to inherit Something to create SomethingElse, and that SomethingElse would not implement ISomething. Now consider this example:

public class Something : ISomething
{
    public void DoSomething() { ... }
    // Add this method
    public void ProcessSomething(Something other) {
        ISomething byInterface = other; // This is legal
        // Now do something with byInterface
    }
}

Your hypothetical code does this:

public class SomethingElse : Something {
   ...
}

Now pass an instance of SomethingElse to ProcessSomething to complete the circle: your SomethingElse is a Something but it is not ISomething, breaking the cast that C# expect to work unconditionally.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. That made it much clearer. Out of curiosity, since I didn't think to test this before, if I referenced another class from LibraryTwo, which didn't implement ISomething, would it still require me to reference LibraryOne? What if it used it internally but never exposed it? – Bobson Oct 24 '13 at 21:33
1  
@Bobson If LibraryOne were used internally and never exposed as part of the LibararyTwo's interface (through inheritance, return parameters, or method arguments), you wouldn't need to reference LibraryOne in your LibraryThree code. – dasblinkenlight Oct 24 '13 at 21:49
    
That makes sense. – Bobson Oct 24 '13 at 21:52

When the CLR executes your application, it loads all the information about the types referenced in your program.

Because Something implements ISomething, the CLR needs to know about the interface - so the .dll containing this interface has to be accessible to the executable.

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Any time you have a library that calls another library you need both in your top level project. How else do you expect the top project to assemble all the necessary files during build?

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