Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to make a PHP class, lets say Myclass.php. Now inside that class I want to define just the class itself and some instance variables. But all the methods must come from a Myclass_methods.php file. Can I just include that file into the class body?

I have good reasons why I want to seperate this. In short, I'll have a backend in which I can change the business logic of a class, while all other things must remain untouched. The system maintains all the ORM and other stuff for me.

But if this is a bad idea, it might be better to re-generate the whole class file after editing the business logic (so, the user-defined methods in this case).

Performance question: If during one request Myclass.php is included just once, actually that Myclass_methods.php should also be included just once. Might be wrong. Experts?

share|improve this question
7  
Don't do this, learn to use OOP properly. –  Ben James Dec 24 '09 at 11:39
    
Use namespace ! –  zloctb Sep 28 '13 at 17:39
add comment

5 Answers 5

up vote 90 down vote accepted

No. You cannot include files in the class body.
In a file defining a class, you may only include files in a method body or outside the class body.

From your description I take you want this:

<?php // MyClass.php
class MyClass
{
    protected $_prop;
    include 'myclass-methods.php';
}

<?php // myclass-methods.php
public function myMethod()
{
   $this->$_prop = 1;
}

Running this code will result in

Parse error: syntax error, unexpected T_INCLUDE, expecting T_FUNCTION

What is possible though is this

<?php // MyClass.php
class MyClass
{
    protected $_prop;
    public function __construct() // or any other method
    {
        include 'some-functions.php';
        foo($b); // echoes 'a';
    }
}

<?php // some-functions.php
$b = 'a';
function foo($str)
{
   echo $str;
}

Doing it this way, will import the contents of the include file into the method scope, not the class scope. You may include functions and variables in the include file, but not methods. You could but should not put entire scripts into it as well and change what the method does, e.g.

<?php // MyClass.php
    // ...
    public function __construct($someCondition)
    {
        // No No Code here
        include ($someCondition === 'whatever') ? 'whatever.php' : 'default.php';
    }
    // ...

<?php // whatever.php
    echo 'whatever';

<?php // default.php
    echo 'foo';

However, patching the class this way to exhibit different behavior is not how you should do it in OOP. It's just plain wrong and should make your eyes bleed.

Since you want to dynamically change behavior, extending the class is also not a good option (see below why). What you really will want to do is write an interface and make your class use objects implementing this interface, thus making sure the appropriate methods are available. This is called a Strategy Pattern and works like this:

<?php // Meowing.php 
interface Meowing
{
    public function meow();
}

Now you got the contract that all Meowing Behaviors must obey, namely having a meow method. Next define a Meowing Behavior:

<?php // RegularMeow.php
class RegularMeow implements Meowing
{
    public function meow()
    {
        return 'meow';
    }
}

Now to use it, use:

<?php // Cat.php
class Cat
{
    protected $_meowing;

    public function setMeowing(Meowing $meowing)
    {
        $this->_meowing = $meowing;
    }

    public function meow()
    {
        $this->_meowing->meow()
    }
}

By adding the Meowing TypeHint to setMeowing, you make sure that the passed param implements the Meowing interface. Let's define another Meowing Behavior:

<?php // LolkatMeow.php
class LolkatMeow implements Meowing
{
    public function meow()
    {
        return 'lolz xD';
    }
}

Now, you can easily interchange behaviors like this:

<?php
require_once 'Meowing.php';
require_once 'RegularMeow.php';
require_once 'LolkatMeow.php';
require_once 'Cat.php';

$cat = new Cat;
$cat->setMeowing(new RegularMeow);
echo $cat->meow; // outputs 'meow';
// now to change the behavior
$cat->setMeowing(new LolkatMeow);
echo $cat->meow; // outputs 'lolz xD';

While you also could have solved the above with inheritance by defining an abstract BaseCat and meow method and then deriving concrete RegularCat and Lolkat classes from that, you have to consider what you want to achieve. If your cats will never change the way they meow, go ahead and use inheritance, but if your RegularCat and Lolkat is supposed to be able to do arbitrary meows, then use the Strategy pattern.

For more design patterns in PHP, check these resources:

share|improve this answer
add comment

Might it not be an idea to create the core class with the relevant base functionality and then extend this with the required methods - it seems like a more logical approach.

share|improve this answer
    
Also calling functions from the class A in source a.php to Class B in b.php would be better than include_once(). Something like Pimpl idiom. –  Priyank Bolia Dec 24 '09 at 10:26
    
You're right, that makes sense. Haven't thought about that option. –  openfrog Dec 24 '09 at 10:26
add comment

I'll start by saying I'm not too clear why this problem is not best solved using a base class containing the methods, subclasses containing the data, and dynamic class loading. I'll assume you have a good reason.

Once your provider supports PHP 5.4 you can do what you want using traits.

Code File:

if ($pet === 'dog') include 'dog.php';
elseif ($pet === 'cat') include 'cat.php';
else die('Unknown pet');

class Pet {
  use PetSounds;
}

$myPet = new Pet();
$myPet->speak();

File cat.php

trait PetSounds {
  function speak() { echo 'meow'; }
}

File dog.php

trait PetSounds {
  function speak() { echo 'woof'; }
}

You could make this even cleaner by naming both include files the same, putting them in different subdirectories, and using set_include_path() or defining an __autoload() function to select between them. Like I said though, this same problem could be solved better using inheritance. If you have a multiple-inheritance type problem though, if for instance you have four kinds of pets with five kinds of colors with three hair types and you need a different combination of methods for each of the 60 different classes, this is the right solution.

5.4 is currently just a Release Candidate (as of 2/24/2012) and even once released most hosts will not support it for many months - mine took 18 months after 5.3 was released before they would support it. Until then you must write entirely separate and complete class files. You can however format your classes with an eventual change to traits in mind.

Right now you can partially get what you want using magic methods and have an easy upgrade to traits when they are available.

Code File:

if ($pet === 'dog') include 'dog.php';
elseif ($pet === 'cat') include 'cat.php';
else die('Unknown pet');

class Pet {
  public function __call($name, array $arguments)
  {
    array_unshift($arguments, $this);
    return call_user_func_array("TraitFunc_$name", $arguments);
  }
}

$myPet = new Pet();
$myPet->speak();

File cat.php

function TraitFunc_speak(Pet $that) { echo 'meow'; }

File dog.php

function TraitFunc_speak(Pet $that) { echo 'woof'; }

You are limited however in that your functions can not access private and protected class properties and methods and you can not use this method to provide magic methods such as __get(). Traits will solve both of those limitations.

share|improve this answer
    
Damn good answer. –  user247245 Nov 29 '12 at 13:11
add comment

Can I just include that file into the class body?

No.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Since PHP5.4 release you can create dynamic objects like this: https://github.com/ptrofimov/jslikeobject

But this is scarcely the best practice.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.