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I created my own simple, compact, ReadWriteLock implementation. The first one uses spinlocks upon trying to acquire a read lock. If the lock bit is set, the second avoids spinlocks by momentarily acquiring the write lock before spinning. That way, it halts its execution until the write lock have been freed. Now my question is which is more efficient and optimized for common use? (both multi-core and non-multi-core machines)

Edit: It is going to be used for my Android app. So I have to keep it compact while providing the ReadWriteLock implementation I need. ReentrantReadWriteLock is heavy for my app. Also, would it be better to use the libraries instead?

Edit: The implementation details were taken from: this link

The first implementation is as follows:

import java.util.concurrent.atomic.AtomicLong;
import java.util.concurrent.locks.ReentrantLock;

public class SpinSeqLock {

    private AtomicLong status = new AtomicLong();
    private ReentrantLock writeLock = new ReentrantLock();

    public long readLock() {
        long current;
        do
            current = status.get();
        while ((current & 1) == 1);
        return current;
    }

    public boolean tryReadUnlock(long previous) {
        return status.get() == previous;
    }

    public void writeLock() {
        writeLock.lock();
        status.incrementAndGet();
    }

    public void writeUnlock() {
        status.incrementAndGet();
        writeLock.unlock();
    }

    public void writeLockInterruptibly() throws InterruptedException {
        writeLock.lockInterruptibly(); // if we get interrupted
        status.incrementAndGet();      // do not lock, do not inc. the status num.
    }
}

The second implementation is as follows:

import java.util.concurrent.atomic.AtomicLong;
import java.util.concurrent.locks.ReentrantLock;

public class SemiSeqLock {

    private AtomicLong status = new AtomicLong();
    private ReentrantLock writeLock = new ReentrantLock();

    public long readLock() {
        for (;;) {
            long current = status.get();
            if ((current & 1) == 0)
                return current;
            writeLock.lock(); // avoid spin lock
            writeLock.unlock();
        }
    }

    public boolean tryReadUnlock(long previous) {
        return status.get() == previous;
    }

    public void writeLock() {
        writeLock.lock();
        status.incrementAndGet();
    }

    public void writeUnlock() {
        status.incrementAndGet();
        writeLock.unlock();
    }

    public void writeLockInterruptibly() throws InterruptedException {
        writeLock.lockInterruptibly(); // if we get interrupted
        status.incrementAndGet();      // do not lock, do not inc. the status num.
    }
}

The expected usage would be:

Reader Thread:

for (;;) {
    final long status = seqLock.readLock();
    // ... some read operation ...
    // ... some read operation ...
    if (seqLock.tryReadUnlock(status)) break;
}

Writer Thread:

seqLock.writeLock();
try {
    // ... some write operation ...
    // ... some write operation ...
} finally {
    seqLock.writeUnlock();
}

Any corrections?

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2  
"I created my own .* lock implementation (in Java)" *shudders*. –  Jonathon Reinhart Oct 24 '13 at 22:32

1 Answer 1

Are you sure that

  • you need it and
  • you can get it better than existing implementation?

Such things are pretty error-prone, much more than usual programs.

So really really try to use an existing lock.

There's at least one error in your lock: writeLockInterruptibly must use finally.

Performance-wise it might be wise to spin a few times before you go to sleep for a long long time via writeLock. Overall I'm not sure it will work... but it looks interesting.

Once again: First try some existing lock written by somebody pretty smart and experienced in this area.

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"writeLockInterruptibly must use finally", doing so would allow the status number to get updated, if the lock was interrupted, then the status number shouldn't increment. Odd numbers locks the write lock. Therefore, the code is working just as intended, no finally blocks needed. –  Jason Sparc Oct 30 '13 at 5:29
    
'Once again: First try some existing lock...', I did, a lot. I have been doing some performance test. Afterwards, I found that they are slowing down my programs. Most of them have a catch, i.e. for ReadWriteLock, says java, "the underlying implementation is complex", that ReentrantLocks runs faster when running a test. –  Jason Sparc Oct 30 '13 at 7:18

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